1st Division – Abner Doubleday

Last Updated February 10, 2011

With quotations by Doubleday first followed by others in alphabetical order of the person making the quote.  The first note is the location where I found the quote and the second is the footnote in that work which contains more background information on the quote.

“outdoor sport I was addicted to was topographical work, and even as a boy I amused myself by making maps of the country around my father’s residence which was in Auburn.” Abner Doubleday

Doubleday speaking about his interests as a youth.

From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) Page 14

Originally From Missouri Republican, May 5 1888,  vol LXXX, issue 21147

Page 13

“The officers of the army were now brought together [and] gave rise to much esprit-de-corps…which later became a powerful impelling motive for noble deeds and heroism.” Abner Doubleday

Doubleday on the Mexican War

From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 27

Originally From My Life in the Old Army: The Reminiscences of Abner Doubleday by Joseph E. Chance. Ft. Worth: Texas Christian University Press, 1998. Page 42

“As there was a principle involved concerning the rights of citizens, I have never been ashamed of the occurrence.” Abner Doubleday

Doubleday discussing his feelings about disobedience of a senior officer’s unlawful order to arrest a civilian.

From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 41

Originally From My Life in the Old Army: The Reminiscences of Abner Doubleday by Joseph E. Chance. Ft. Worth: Texas Christian University Press, 1998. Page 149

” I tried to instruct him [the new recruit] in his duties without unnecessary severity and without hurting his feelings.” Abner Doubleday

Doubleday on training of enlisted men. From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 51

Originally From My Life in the Old Army: The Reminiscences of Abner Doubleday by Joseph E. Chance. Ft. Worth: Texas Christian University Press, 1998. Page 205

“Such of them as love slavery better than their country are not now, and have never been, friends of the Union.”

Abner Doubleday

Doubleday on slavery From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 55

Originally From My Life in the Old Army: The Reminiscences of Abner Doubleday by Joseph E. Chance. Ft. Worth: Texas Christian University Press, 1998. Page 195

“as I had been at Fort Sumter and that was the only battle of the war they looked up to me with considerable admiration and respect…” Abner Doubleday

Doubleday discussing his first command after Fort Sumter From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 80

Originally From My Life in the Old Army: The Reminiscences of Abner Doubleday by Joseph E. Chance. Ft. Worth: Texas Christian University Press, 1998. Page 246

“In taking leave of this command, I desire to say one word of farewell.  Wherever the service may call me, and whatever may be my future lot, I shall never forget the ties which bind me to this Brigade and this Division.  I shall never cease to remember the brave men who stood by my side [and] have won my admiration and regard.  I am happy to have fought by their side, and proud of the honor of having commanded them.” Abner Doubleday

February 1863 Doubleday’s farewell address to the First Division First Corps

From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) Page 128

Originally From History of the Seventy-Sixth New York Volunteers: by Abram P. Smith. (Cortland, NY: Turair, Smith and Miles, printers [Syracuse], 1867.) page 197

“That sandwich will need no pepper.” Abner Doubleday July 3 1863

Doubleday to Maj Harry T. Lee of his staff on July 3 at Gettysburg.  As he is about to eat a sandwich, it is showered with dirt from a Confederate artillery round which exploded nearby.

From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 163

Originally From History of Pennsylvania Volunteers 1861-5: Prepared in Compliance with Acts of the Legislature by Samuel P. Bates. (Wilmington, NC: Broadfoot, 1993.) page 57

“The rebels did not seem to appreciate my humanity in sending out to bring in their wounded, for they opened a savage fire against the stretcher bearers.  One shell burst among us, a piece of it knocked me over on my horse’s neck, and wounded Lieutenant Cowdry of my staff.” Abner Doubleday

Doubleday recalling his efforts to aid wounded Confederates at the Battle of Gettysburg From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 168

Originally From Chancellorsville and Gettysburg by Abner Doubleday. (New York: Scribner’s, 1882) page 196

“Having ascertained officially that you are my junior in rank, I consider myself relieved from the command of the 3d Division of this corps & shall report to Head Qtrs of the Army for duty, as I cannot receive orders from you.” Abner Doubleday July 5 1862

Doubleday to Maj Gen Newton, new commander of the First Corps after Gettysburg

From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 171

Originally From Doubleday to John Newton, July 5, 1863. Abner Doubleday Papers, New York Historical Society.

“When you reflect that there were not more than twenty such Republican officers in the U.S. Army, it is time that those who have been true to their principles under the opposing circumstances surrounding them should be remembered.  We ought to have officers to command our arm whose heart is in the work like Captain Lyons of St. Louis and Captain Doubleday of Fort Sumter.” William Doubleday July 5 1861

William Doubleday to Senator Chadler recommending Doubleday’s promotion to Major

From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) Page 77

Originally From Army of the Potomac: Vol. 2, McClellan Takes Command, September 1861-February 1862 by Russel H. Beatie. (Cambridge: Da Capo, 2005.) page 176

“He is deficient considerably in the requisites of a commander.  He does not drink whiskey…stays with his command and seems anxious to do his duty and fight Rebels….He also allows his wife to stay with him when he ought to keep a mistress.” William O. Blodget

1LT Blodgett of Co F, 151 Pennsylvania says this about Doubleday

From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 138

Originally From The 151st Pennsylvania Volunteers at Gettysburg: Like Ripe Apples in a Storm by Michael Dreese and Timothy H. Smith. (Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2000.) page 37

“Gen. Doubleday was not a man of ‘personal magnetism’ nor what is called a dashing officer.’ He was an earnest and conscientious man and a safe and steady soldier-precise, methodical, and to be depended on in any emergency.” Don Carlos Buell

Buell describing Abner Doubleday From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 138

“The withering fire that came over the crest caused the line to fall slowly back.  General Doubleday seized the colors of one of the regiments and rode forward with them.  The men rally enthusiastically around him.  One takes from him the colors and plants them in advance.  The men are falling fast.  Darkness descends.  From out of the treacherous woods on our left comes a sheet of flame.  The sheltered enemy evidently have us in a terrible death angle.” Uberto Burnham

First Sergeant Uberto Burnham of the 76th New York describes Doubleday’s actions at Second Bull Run

From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 104

Originally From Uberto Burnham Papers. New York State Library. [76th New York] page 523

“Doubleday, to whom Reynolds has transferred the command of the First Corps…in the course of this day exhibit[ed] as much tenacity as presence of mind.” Comte de Paris

Comte de Paris on Doubleday’s performance on Day 1 at Gettysburg

From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 175

Originally From History of the Civil War in America by the Comte de Paris. Translated by Louis Fitzgerald Tasistro. (Philadelphia: J.H. Coates, 1875-1888.) page 551

“about daylight, General Doubleday came galloping along the line, and he ordered [the brigades] be moved out at once out of its position.  He said we were in range of rebel batteries.” Rufus Dawes

Dawes describes Doubleday at Antietam From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 113

Originally From Service with the Sixth Wisconsin Volunteers by Rufus R. Dawes. (Marietta, OH: E.R. Alderman, 1890.) page 87

“Gen. Doubleday who is a gallant officer.  I saw him at Antietam….He was remarkably cool and at the very front of battle, near Battery B at the haystacks.” Rufus Dawes

Dawes describes Doubleday at Antietam From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 117

Originally From Service with the Sixth Wisconsin Volunteers by Rufus R. Dawes. (Marietta, OH: E.R. Alderman, 1890.)

Page 115

“Doubleday, [being] tall and tending toward a bit of portliness.” Lucas Fairchild

Colonel Fairchild of the 2d Wisconsin recalls Doubleday From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 173

Originally From The Gettysburg Campaign: A Study in Command by Edwin Coddington. New York:  Scribner’s, 1968.

Page 690

“He was perfectly honest in his faith….Whatever a skeptic may think of the founders of the society, he could not help believing that this old soldier was a genuine Buddhist and had found much consolation in the religion which he embraced towards the end of his life.” Harper’s Weekly Jan 16 1893

An obituary found in Harper’s Weekly

From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) Page 218

Originally From Harper’s Weekly, January 16, 1893

“Doubleday exhibited the greatest gallantry in leading on his brigade under a terrible fire on the night of the 29th, and, with his aide-de-camp, Maj. U. Doubleday, and Capt. E.P. Halstead, assistant adjutant general, did much by reckless daring toward keeping this brigade from giving way when hard-pressed.” John Hatch Sep 13 1862

Division Commander John Hatch decribing Doubleday’s actions at Second Bull Run in his official report.

From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.)

Page 106

“I desire to make special mention…Brigadier-General Doubleday, who rendered me an enlightened and generous assistance.” Joseph Hooker Nov 7 1862

Hooker’s official report commends Doubleday at Antietam

From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.)

Page 117

“General Doubleday was in height and weight considerably above average.  He stood six feet at least.  He was a handsome man, a brunette and so striking in his appearance that, whether riding or walking, he would attract attention anywhere.  He was always dignified; his manners were pleasing and he was ever courteous to those who came into contact with him.  Notable among his characteristics was the interest that he took in the comfort and welfare of those in his command.  His modesty prevented him from having an unnecessary number of aides, but he wanted those in his military family to be alert, neat, attentive to their duties.” Henry S. Huidekoper

Lieutenant Colonel Huidekoper a member of his command says this about Doubleday

From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) Page 138

Originally From Meredith L. Jones Commemorative address in New York Monuments Commission for the Battlefields of Gettysburg, Chattanooga, an Antietam: In Memoriam Abner Doubleday, 1819-1893, and John Cleveland Robinson, 1817-1897. Albany, NY: 1918. Page 47

“I admired him and reverenced him highly….I can say that he had apersonal charms that were fascinating.”

Henry S. Huidekoper

Huidekoper speaking at the dedication of Doubleday’s statue at Gettysburg in 1917

From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) Page 227

Originally From H.S. Huidekoper in New York Monuments Commission for the Battlefields of Gettysburg, Chattanooga, an Antietam: In Memoriam Abner Doubleday, 1819-1893, and John Cleveland Robinson, 1817-1897. Albany, NY: 1918.

“It can be said of him that he was kindly, and just and true.  His manner was never asuming or harsh, and he was never unnecessarily severe towards those under him.  He was a gentleman of exemplary habits. Words of profanity ever remained strangers to his lips.  Tobacco or liquor he never indulged in; but he did not object to others using them.” Meredith L. Jones

One of Doubleday’s staff officers describes him From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 86

Originally From Meredith L. Jones Commemorative address in New York Monuments Commission for the Battlefields of Gettysburg, Chattanooga, an Antietam: In Memoriam Abner Doubleday, 1819-1893, and John Cleveland Robinson, 1817-1897. Albany, NY: 1918. Page 58

“General Abner Doubleday was a tall dignified looking gentleman as is commonly called of the old school.  At the time I met him he was inclined to be portly.  His forehead was very full.  His hair was dark, crisp and oily-well streaked with white.  A large full high beaked nose; gray eyes; heavily bagged underneath.  A short trimmed bushy mustache, almost black; very swarthy.  His hands [are] small and smooth in structure.  His expression was very serious, but lighting up when he started to tell his fine, wholesome, and humorous stories.  I made a study of his head which his friends said was good- to me it seemed a little prim as Mrs. Doubleday insisted on brushing his hair and slicking him up.” Kelly

Sculptor Kelly describing Doubleday and his story telling expertise From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 205

Originally From Interviewing the Commanders of the Civil War by William B. Styple. (Kearny, NJ: Grove, 2005.)

Page 45

“I wish Abner Doubleday, now a captain in the First Artillery, to be a major in the similar corps if possible.”

Lincoln, Abraham

Lincoln’s order directing promotion of Doubleday to major after Fort Sumter

From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 77

“Doubleday has been assigned to the Reserves which is a good thing for me for now they will think a great deal more of me than before.” George Meade

Meade to his wife reacting sarcastically to Doubleday’s reassignment to the Reserves

From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) Page 176

Originally From The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade: Major-General United States Army by George Gordon Meade. (New York: Scribner’s, 1913.) page 53

“Doubleday, to whom that command fell by seniority, was brave and capable enough for ordinary emergencies; but this emergency was extraordinary, and the soldier to whom he succeeded was without peer in the army….Stll, it is no disparagement on the other that the same cannot be said of him.” George Meade Jr.

Meade’s son on Doubleday From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 183

Originally From The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade: Major-General United States Army by George Gordon Meade. (New York: Scribner’s, 1913.) page 46

“General Doubleday…commanded at Fredericksburg, and by his personal bravery, and the skill with which he handled his command on that occasion, and by his uniform kindness to the officers, and men under him was endeared to every officer and soldier…” Henry A. Morrow

Colonel Morrow of the 24th Michigan describes Doubleday at Fredericksburg From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 125

“General Doubleday was one of those men who went to war on principle.  With comprehensive views on the questions involved and the causes of the war, and a clear conception of the character of the rebel leaders and the personal motives which actuated them, he believed what everyone now realizes-that the kid-glove style of treatment would never accomplish anything for the Union.  With him, compromise was disloyalty and death to the government.” Abram Smith

Historian of the 76th NY Infantry on Doubleday

From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 89

Originally From History of the Seventy-Sixth New York Volunteers: by Abram P. Smith. (Cortland, NY: Turair, Smith and Miles, printers [Syracuse], 1867.) page 196

“It was natural that the men who had followed him through the terrible marches and scenes of difficulty and danger, on the retreat saved by his skill and by the same skill and courage, led him to victory, and wh had become proud of their leader, should experience deep regret at his parting.” Abram Smith Feb 1863

Reaction of the 76th NY upon Doubleday’s transfer to 3d Div, First Corps in Feb 1863 From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 127

Originally From History of the Seventy-Sixth New York Volunteers: by Abram P. Smith. (Cortland, NY: Turair, Smith and Miles, printers [Syracuse], 1867.) page 197

“I have a conversation of about ten minutes with the general every morning, when I receive a vast deal of information as to the art of war.  The general is a fine theorist.  He is said to be slow in the field, and perhaps he may be, but he has many fine ualities, is very careful of his men, very pain staking, and evidently zealous in the cause.  He is a very urbane, courteous gentleman also.” Staff Officer

A staff officer describes Doubleday  From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 130

Originally From History of the 150th Pennsylvania Volunteers, Second Regiment Bucktail Brigade by Thomas Chamberlin. (Stan Clark Military Books, 1986 (Originally Published: Philadelphia: F. McManus, Jr., 1905) page 64

“He was in the saddle, cool and motionless, absorbed in deep thought, and as each of the three regiments went by he called out to them, “Men, General Reynolds has been killed.  Today your are to fight in Pennsylvania.  Do your best.”  These inspiring words still ring in my ears, and the figure of the general as he spoke them is as clear to me now recalling it as it was fifty-four years ago.” Staff Officer

A staff officer recalls Doubleday at Gettysburg

From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 145

Originally From Meredith L. Jones Commemorative address in New York Monuments Commission for the Battlefields of Gettysburg, Chattanooga, an Antietam: In Memoriam Abner Doubleday, 1819-1893, and John Cleveland Robinson, 1817-1897. Albany, NY: 1918. Page 48

“All his life he was an inquirer into the true life of the soul….He was well-known to the members who universally respected his character and were attracted by his gentleness. The Path

The Thesophical magazine The Path wrote in February 1893

From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 218

Originally From The Path, February 1893

“Though Doubleday was not a ‘popular commander’ he was respected by his men as a hard fighter and this respect had been muched increased by his handling of them in the day’s battle [at Gettysburg].” James Wadsworth

General Wadsworth wrote this of Doubleday From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page174

Originally From James S. Wadsworth of Geneseo: Brevet Major-General of Unite States Volunteers by Henry Greenleaf Pearson. (New York: Scribner’s, 1913.) page 321

“Doubleday knows enough but he is entirely impractical, and so slow at getting an idea through his head.  Wadsworth is active, always busy at something.” Charles S. Wainwright March 8 1862

Wainwright describes Abner Doubleday compared to James Wadsworth From

A Diary of Battle The Personal Journals of Colonel Charles S. Wainright 1861-1865. Edited b. Allan Nevins. ( New York:  De Capo Press, 1998.) page 171

“I had no confidence in Doubleday, and felt he would be a weak reed to lean upon; that it would not do for me to wait for orders from him, but that I must judge and act for myself.  Even at this time, Doubleday was riding at the head of the Second Division, waiting orders I suppose.” Charles S. Wainwright

Wainwright’s impression of Doubleday as Reynolds is killed and Doubleday assumes command of the First Corps

From Wainwright, Charles S. A Diary of Battle The Personal Journals of Colonel Charles S. Wainright 1861-1865. Ed. Allan Nevins. New York:  De Capo Press, 1998. Page  233

“He was correct in deportment, social and communicative with his companions, unobtrusive in conversation, yet freely taking his part therein, and quite entertaining.  He enjoyed a good anecdote and had some of his own to tell.  He was rather averse to out-door sports and retiring in his manner.  He was a diligent and thoughtful student, something of a critic, and fond of questions in moral philosophy.  He was free from the use of tobacco, from profane words, or any vicious habit.  It is not remembered that he was ever suspected of going to “Bennys” or visiting the “pirate” after taps, or doing anything that deserved extra hours of Saturday afternoon guard duty.  In truth, he was careful as to his demerit roll, for his first year showed only 24 against him, a small number.  There is no recollection that he “scrubbed for a corporalcy, yet presumably hd did, as most all good plebes do.”

Doubleday’s reputation at West Point

From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 20

Originally From My Life in the Old Army: The Reminiscences of Abner Doubleday by Joseph E. Chance. Ft. Worth: Texas Christian University Press, 1998. Page 48

“had kept his guns at work on the right and finally silenced a rebel battery that for half an hour had poured in a galling enfilading fire along Hooker’s central line….There was a heavy timbered woods in front which the rebels occupied in strong force, but as long as Doubleday’s guns pointed in that direction they did not care to leave their shelter to attack on the right.”

Describing Doubleday’s work with the super battery in the afternoon at Antietam

From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 115

Originally From History of the Pennsylvania Reserve Corps by Josiah Rinehart Syper. (Lancaster, PA: Elias Barr, 1865.) Page 386

“General Doubleday was so placid-so free from any sudden impulse-that the members of his staff used to call him ‘Forty-Eight Hours.’ His habitual composure in a marked degree influenced the officers and men under him.”

Doubleday’s nickname of Forty-Eight Hours

From Abner Doubleday A Civil War Biography by Thomas Barthel. (Jefferson:  McFarland & Co., 2010.) page 174

Originally From Meredith L. Jones Commemorative address in New York Monuments Commission for the Battlefields of Gettysburg, Chattanooga, an Antietam: In Memoriam Abner Doubleday, 1819-1893, and John Cleveland Robinson, 1817-1897. Albany, NY: 1918.

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