Ambrose Powell Hill’s Division

Ambrose Powell Hill

Ambrose Powell Hill Quotes

Last Updated January 16, 2010

With quotations by Hill first followed by others in alphabetical order of the person making the quote

“Good for you, boys!  Give them the rocks and bayonets, and hold your position, and I will soon have ammunition and reinforcements for you”

Hill, AP

Second Manassas Aug 29 1862

AP Hill upon coming to Gregg’s Brigade at Second Manassas

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 121

“damm you, if you will not follow me, I’ll die alone!”

Hill, AP

Fraysers Farm

Seven Days

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 92

“My arm was perfectly sore from beating the men into obedience [with] both fist and sword

Hill, AP

Written in Mexico about experiences with stragglers

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 16

“The superior nerve and enthusiasm of our men will ever drive back [the enemy] back when the bayonet is resorted to”

Hill, AP

Battle of Williamsburg

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 57

“you are a pretty fellow to hold a commission-deserting your colors in the presence of the enemy, and going to the rear with a man who is scarcely badly enough wounded to go himself.  I reduce you to the ranks sir, and if you do not go to the front and do your duty, I’ll have you shot as soon as I can spare a file of men for the purpose!”

Hill, AP

Cedar Mountain Campaign Aug  9, 1862

Hill upon coming upon a lieutenant half running for the rear during the battle of Cedar Mountain.  Southern Historical Society Papers SHSP, X (1882), 89.

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 105

Hill: “If you take command of my troops in my presence, take my sword also.”  Jackson:  ”  Put up your sword and consider yourself in arrest.”

Hill, AP

Sep 4 1862

Arrest of AP Hill by Stonewall Jackson as witnessed by COL William Palmer and Jed Hotchkiss

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 131

“I remember seeing him visiting, as was his custom, his field hospitals, looking after the comfort of his wounded, and with his own hands lifting some of the poor fellows into more comfortable positions.”

A chaplain

After Fredericksburg

Confederate Veteran, I (1893), 235

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 167

“of a very high strung sensitive nature”

a member of his staff felt

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 97

“marched on foot with the rear guard all the day through Maryland, an old white hat slouched over his eyes, his coat off and wearing an old flannel shirt, looking mad as a bull.”

A NC lieutenant

Sep 1862

Describing AP Hill while under arrest in the early stages of the Maryland campaign

AP Hill website:  http://www.aphillcsa.com/n94.html

“among the men, leading and cheering them on in his quiet and determined manner…”

A participant

June 29 1862

Seven Days

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 89

“the great responsibilities of the lieutenant generally seemed to have told upon his naturally buoyant spirits, and there was ever a gravity about him that he maintained until the day of his death…. he had ceased to be the inspiring Hill of the old Light Division”

a soldier SC sergeant who served under Hill.

Confederate Veteran, XXX (1922), 246

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 240

“donning his coat and sword he mounted his horse and dashed to the front of his troops, and looking like a young eagle in search of his prey, took command of his division to the delight of all his men.”

a soldier

Sep 10 1862

soldier describing Hill’s release from arrest

AP Hill website:  http://www.aphillcsa.com/n94.html

“erect, magnificent, the god of war himself, amid the smoke and the thunder

A soldier

Battle of Williamsburg

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 55

“he made a splendid picture of the heroic and gallant soldier that he was

A soldier

Battle of Williamsburg

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 53

“a small man, can be scarcely more than 5 ft 8 in. high, nor weigh more than 125 or 130 lbs;..he wears a heavy long sandy beard; he looks rather weather-beaten he was dressed very plainly, rode a splendid grey horse and seemed to have perfect control of himself & of his horse in the saddle; he seemed to be very lively and talkative

a Virginia chaplain

Oct 1864

a Virginia chaplain observing Hill at a division review

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 305

“He is a small man, but has a very military bearing and a countenance pleasing but inexpressibly sad”

a women

Jun 19 1864

a women observing Lee and Hill attending church

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 284

“Donning his coat and sword he mounted his horse and dashed to the front of his troops, and looking like a young eagle in search of his prey, he took command of his division to the delight of all his men”

An officer describing the suspension of Hill’s arrest

Sep 11 1862

Clark, N.C. Regiments, IV, 165

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 135

“so mingled rigid discipline and kind consideration for the command as to win the respect, admiration and love of the whole brigade as he had always had of his own regiment

Brigade Chaplain in Elzey’s Bde

early in 1862

chaplain writing about Hill’s friendship with the men

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 46

“He was very cordial, his duties have not puffed him up, but have only sobered him”

Broadus, Rev John A.

Describing Hill after promotion to corps command Archibald T. Robertson, Life and Letters of John A. Broadus (Philadelphia, 1901), 203

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 230

“He was constantly on the lines, riding with firm graceful seat, looking every inch a soldier.  Like General Lee, he was rarely much attended.  One staff officer and a single courier formed his usual escort, and often he made the rounds alone.  Of ordinary height, his figure was slight but athletic, his carriage erect, and his dress plainly neat.  His expression was grave but gentle, his manner so courteous as almost to lack decision, but was contradicted by rigidity about the mouth and chin, and bright flashing eyes that even in repose told another tale.  In moments of excitement he never lost self-control nor composure of demeanor, but his glance was sharp as an eagles, and his voice could take a metallic ring”

Cameron, Capt William E

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 308

At the critical moment A.P. Hill was always at his strongest. … Again A.P. Hill, as at Manassas, Harper’s Ferry, and elsewhere had struck with the right hand of Mars.

Douglas, Kyd

recollection in Battles and Leaders

AP Hill website:  http://www.aphillcsa.com/n94.html

“Gen Hill is a brave officer but perhaps too quick to resent seeming overstepping [sic] of authority.  General Jackson intends to do his whole duty.  May good and not evil come out of this trouble.”

Hotchkiss, Jed

Oct 6 1862

Hotchkiss Journal describing Hill’s refusal to compromise in the issue of a court martial

Robertson, James I.  Stonewall Jackson The Man, The Soldier, The Legend. New York:  Macmillan Publishing Co, 1997 pg 627

Powell Hill “found in every order that was issued to him something to complain of…”Only a surly obedience was rendered by Hill and his subordinates to orders from corps headquaraters….was very careless in his manner in his manner of obeying orders and was by no means the vigilant soldier he should have been….Hill did not seem to have the proper appreciation of the element of time in military affairs, and then he had a very hot-headed and badly disciplined temper.”

Hotchkiss, Jed

Jan 1863

Hotchkiss memorandum on Hill, Reel 49, Hotchkiss–LC

Robertson, James I.  Stonewall Jackson The Man, The Soldier, The Legend. New York:  Macmillan Publishing Co, 1997 pg 680

“General Hill, charge and give them the bayonet”

Jackson, Thomas

Sep 15 1862

Jackson ordering the capture of Harpers Ferry

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 137

“Order A.P. Hill to prepare for action!  Pass the infantry to the front immediately!  Tell Major Hawks…

Jackson, Thomas

May 10 1863

Among Jackson’s last words

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 192

“the lithe and active form of the most graceful man in the army”

Johnson, Bradley

Description of Hill by Bradley T. Johnson

Robertson, James I.  Stonewall Jackson The Man, The Soldier, The Legend. New York:  Macmillan Publishing Co, 1997 pg 627

“Drove the enemy immediately from the position they had taken, and continued the contest until dark, restoring our right, and maintaining our ground”

Lee, Robert E.

Sep 17 1862

In Lee’s first official communiqué.  Lee, Wartime Papers, 311

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 147

“he is now at rest, and we who are left are the ones to suffer”

Lee, Robert E.

April 2 1865

Lee on hearing of Hill’s death

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 318

“I think upon the whole [Hill] is the best soldier of his grade with me”

Lee, Robert E.

May 1863

Letter to Davis

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. pg192

“Next to these two officers, [Longstreet and Jackson] I consider General A.P. Hill the best commander with me.  He fights his troops well and takes good care of them.”

Lee, Robert E.

Nov 1862

When Pres Davis asked Lee for recommendations for corps command OR XIX, Pt. 2, 643

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 154

“Tell A.P. Hill he must come up!”

Lee, Robert E.

1870

Lee’s final hours

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 148

A.P. Hill you will find I think a good officer with whom you can consult and by advising with your division commanders as to your movements much trouble will be saved you in arranging details as they can act more intelligently.

Lee, Robert E.

Late July 1862

Letter by Lee to Jackson upon assignment of Hills Division to Jackson’s command

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 98

“Well, well, General, bury those poor men and let us say no more about it”

Lee, Robert E.

Oct 14 1863

Lee discussing battle of Bristoe Station with AP Hill

unk

“Hill is about my size, sandy whiskers and red face.  Rather an ordinary-looking man, except his eye and that is keen, flashing, and very intelligent”

Lodge, Cpt George R.  of 53rd IL

CPT Lodge of 53 La POW who met Hill in Libby prison.  Roger Tuskin, “In the Bastille of the Rebels,” Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, LVI, (1963), 329-30

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 246

“Hill’s defences are as well advanced as those of any part of the line.  His troops are in fine condition…Hill is every inch a soldier, and is destined to make his mark”

Long, Armistead

In front of Richmond around time of Seven Days

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 65

“Outflanked and staggered by the gallant attack of A.P.Hill’s brigades”

Longstreet, James

Sep 17 1862

Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, 261

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 142

The troops of the gallant A.P. Hill that did as much and effective fighting as any, received little of the credit properly due them.  It was their long and steady fight that thinned the Federal ranks and caused them to so foul their guns that they were out of order when the final struggle came.

Longstreet, James

Gaines Mill Jun 27 1862

Longstreet From Manassas to Appomattox

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 86

[a Virginia colonel who unexpectedly] came in and sat down with us [privates] and talked to us in as friendly a way as if we had been his equals in rank”

Member of 1st Maryland

early in 1862

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 46

“In the battle of yesterday, he displayed in the highest degree, all the talents of a commander, with the exception of proper caution of his own life, which he exposed from the first shot to the last, with the recklessness of a trooper

Richmond Enquirer

June 27 1862

In front of Richmond around time of Seven Days

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 77

“Hill was a West Point man of medium height, a light, good figure, and most pleasing soldierly appearance.  He surely handled his division on all occasions with great ability and courage and justly earned high reputation.  When Lee created the Third Army Corps, he placed him in command of it, and it was thought Hill did not realize in that position all that was hoped of him.

Sorrel, Moxley

Describing A.P. Hill

Sorrell, G. Moxley.  Recollections of a Confederate Staff Officer. New York:  Bantam edition, 1992. Pg 64

“Gen. Hill is beloved by his own command, and his name is frequently mentioned with enthusiasm by the troops of other divisions.  He is a brave and skillful officer-having made arms not only his profession, but an enthusiastic study, to which he was prompted by the natural tastes and disposition of his mind”

Southern Illustrated News

Nov 22 1862

Southern Illustrated News Nov 22, 1862

Robertson, James I.  General A. P. Hill. New York:  Random 1987. Pg 158

“Hill does not work well with Stonewall”

Wardlaw, Andrew

Oct 5 1862

Wardlaw of the 14th South Carolina to his wife.

Robertson, James I.  Stonewall Jackson The Man, The Soldier, The Legend. New York:  Macmillan Publishing Co, 1997 pg 628

2 Responses

  1. Hello,
    My minister is an exact double for General Robert E. Lee. He will portray General Lee on Memorial Day Sunday the religious man. I, myself deducted the personality that I am: with some modesty, I am very much like General A.P. Hill…fiery personality, loyalty to friends, a cause, etc. to the core. I am a man really of the 19th century who was born in the 20th and now pass into the 21 century. I was born in the wrong century. My research shows that my family fought on both the Union and Confederate side.
    Ron Hennessee

  2. Tell AP Hill,
    When I first read of AP Hill, back in my early 30′s, I had never heard of him. After learning and reading about Hill, I come to realise that there are many great people who never really come to their potential due to circumstances beyond their control.

    I also wonder what many men like Hill would have been able to achieve if not for the war, or Lincoln’s call for troops to put down secession in the deep South. Virginia, Tennessee, and my own North Carolina probably would not have left the Union.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: