Maryland Campaign

The Maryland Campaign.  This page covers general quotes about the Maryland Campaign excluding the actions at South Mountain, Antietam, and Shepherdstown.  The first set of quotes are by and about the Confederates and are organized alphabetically by the person making the quote.  The second set of quotes are by and about the Union forces and are also organized alphabetically by the person making the quote.  This page was last updated on June 26, 2011

CONFEDERATE QUOTES

 “The large majority of the people were silent in regard to giving demonstrations of opinion; many because they were really hostile to us, and some because they knew that every one was narrowly watched by Spies, by, by the remnant of Yankee forces on parole in the town, and most of all by their own neighbors.”

A Confederate private on the invasion of Maryland

From How the North Won by Herman Hattaway and Archer Jones. Urbana:  University of Illinois Press 1983. Pg 244

Catton, Bruce. Terrible Swift Sword (New York, 1963)

 

“I was beholding what must be the turning point of the war.”

A confederate staff officer commenting on the invasion of Maryland

From Cavalryman of the Lost Cause by Jeffry D. Wert.  New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008.  139

Wert, Jeffry D.  A Brotherhood of Valor:  The Common Soldiers of the Stonewall Brigade C.S.A., and the Iron Brigade, U.S.A.  New York:  Simon Schuster, 1999

 

“I don’t like the idea, as I don’t like to invade anybody’s Country.”

A Virginia boy in John Walker’s brigade

From “The Army of Northern Virginia in September 1862.” by Robert K. Krick.  Antietam – Essays on the 1862 Maryland Campaign. Ed. Gary Gallagher  Kent OH:  Kent State University Press, 1989. 43

“Never were want and exhaustion more visibly put before my eyes, and that they could march or fight at all seemed incredible.”

a Virginia woman commenting on Lee’s veterans at this time

From Cavalryman of the Lost Cause by Jeffry D. Wert.  New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008 152

Wert, Jeffry D. The Sword of Lincoln:  The Army of the Potomac.  New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2005

“The Lord bless your dirty ragged souls!”

A women in Frederick who supports the Confederates

From How the North Won by Herman Hattaway and Archer Jones. Urbana:  University of Illinois Press 1983. 244

Long, E.B., The Civil War, Day by Day: An Almanac, 1861-1865. New York, 1971

 

“Please do not let him get off without being hurt.”

Abraham Lincoln to George McClellan

Sep 13 1862

From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak.  Charleston:  The History Press, 2011.  30

McClellan, George B. The Civil War Papers of George B. McClellan. Ed. Stephen W. Sears. New York: Ticknor & Fields, 1989.

“I fear Maryland is not going to come to our relief, a few of her sons may be loyal but not so many that we might risk our army in her borders.”

Ada W. Bacot

Sep 21 1862

Bacot, a South Carolina plantation widow working in hospitals in Charlottesville

From “The Net Result of the Campaign Was in Our Favor.” by Gary Gallagher.  The Antietam Campaign. Ed. Gary Gallagher  Chapel Hill:  The University of North Carolina Press,  1999. 15

Bacot, Ada W., A Confederate Nurse: The Diary of Ada W. Bacot, 1860-1863, ed. Jean V. Berlin (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1994), [entry for Sept 21 1862]

“Our army is small, but fights gloriously…Great numbers of men have straggled off, until none but heroes are left.”

Alexander Cheves Haskell

Haskell, a member of a SC family that sent 7 brothers to the army wrote shortly after Antietam

From “A Season of Opportunity.” by Gary W. Gallagher. Antietam – Essays on the 1862 Maryland Campaign. Ed by Gary Gallagher  Kent OH:  Kent State University Press, 1989. 10

“We are in far better condition in every respect, than when we first invaded the cold, treacherous soil of Maryland.”

Alexander Cheves Haskell

Haskell, a member of a SC family that sent 7 brothers to the army wrote shortly after Antietam

From “The Maryland Campaign in Perspective.” by Gary W. Gallagher. Antietam – Essays on the 1862 Maryland Campaign. Ed.  Gary Gallagher  Kent OH:  Kent State University Press, 1989. 86

“Lee’s principal objective in going into Maryland,…[and] one of the most brilliant achievements of the war.  [Sharpsburg] was only an incident to the main object, in which our forces were victorious, though the victory was dearly bought.”

Alexander Stephens

October 30, 1862

Confederate Vice President Alexander Stephens opinion on the Maryland Campaign

From “The Net Result of the Campaign Was in Our Favor.” by Gary Gallagher.  The Antietam Campaign. Ed. Gary Gallagher  Chapel Hill:  The University of North Carolina Press,  1999. page8

Atlanta Southern Confederacy, October 30, 1862

“It may become necessary in the course of the war, to abandon for the present the idea of incorporating Maryland into the Confederacy…;yet let us not judge her people who labor under great difficulties, either hastily or harshly.”

Charleston Mercury Oct 15 1862

Opinion of the Savannah Republican quoted in Charleston Mercury On the lack of support by Maryland civilians

From “Maryland Our Maryland.” by William A. Blair. The Antietam Campaign, Ed. Gary Gallagher Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1999. 92

Charleston Mercury Sep 6 1862

 

“Maryland, from her eastern shore to the Blue Ridge, is throbbing with the hope of early deliverance, and sits uneasy in her chains.”

Charleston Mercury Sep 6 1862

A Charleston Editor On the issue of Maryland awaiting liberation from a southern newspaper editor

From “Maryland Our Maryland.” by William A. Blair. The Antietam Campaign, Ed. Gary Gallagher Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1999. 89

“but thousands of thieving poltroons had kept away from sheer cowardice. The straggler is generally a thief and always a coward, lost to all sense of shame; he can only be kept in ranks by a strict and sanguinary discipline.

D.H. Hill

Hill describing straggling in the Maryland campaign in his official report

From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak.  Charleston:  The History Press, 2011.  20

OR 19 (1)

“filthy unprincipled set of villains….The officers are nearly as bad as the men.  In one of my Regts the other day when they thought they were going to get into a fight, six out [of] ten officers skulked out and did not come up until they thought all danger over. Oh dear, oh dear, our army is coming to a pretty pass.”

Dorsey Pender writing about stragglers in his brigade

From “The Net Result of the Campaign Was in Our Favor.” by Gary Gallagher.  The Antietam Campaign. Ed. Gary Gallagher  Chapel Hill:  The University of North Carolina Press,  1999. 26

Pender, William Dorsey.  The General to His Wife:  The Civil War Letters of William Dorsey Pender to Fanny Pender.  Ed. William Woods Hassler. Chapel Hill:  Univ of North Carolina Press, 1965

“My only regret is that we crossed in the first place.”

Dorsey Pender Sept 28 1862

Pender in a letter to his wife

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. 476

Pender, William Dorsey.  The General to His Wife:  The Civil War Letters of William Dorsey Pender to Fanny Pender.  Ed. William Woods Hassler. Chapel Hill:  Univ of North Carolina Press, 1965

“Our army has shown itself incapable of invasion, and we better stick to the defensive.”

Dorsey Pender

Sep 22 1862

Pender in a letter to his wife

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. 488

Pender, William Dorsey.  The General to His Wife:  The Civil War Letters of William Dorsey Pender to Fanny Pender.  Ed. William Woods Hassler. Chapel Hill:  Univ of North Carolina Press, 1965

 

“Never did I behold so many naked legs in my life.”

Draughton Stith Haynes

Sep 4 1862

A member of the 49th Georgia describing the crossing of the Potomac 49 GA Inf

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. 87

Haynes, Draughton Stith. The Field Guide of a Confederate Soldier, Draughton Stith Haynes, While Serving with the Army of Northern Virginia, C.S.A. Darien Ga:  Ashant                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      illy, 1963

“the confounded Yankees can shoot better in the United States than they can when they come to Dixieland.”

George M. Neese

One of Chew’s gunners regarding a cavalry action at Poolesville on September 8 1862

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. 122

Neese, George Michael.  Three Years in the Confederate Horse Artillery, by…a Gunner in Chew’s Battery.  New York:  Neale Publishing, 1911

 

“our men was not conducive to the inspiring of confidence.”

George Wilson Booth

Lieut Booth of the Confederate 1st Maryland admits the natives were not receptive to the invaders 1

\ MD Inf CSA

From Counter-Thrust From the Peninsula to the Antietam by Benjamin Franklin Cooling. Lincoln: University of Nebraska 2007. 198

“as valid as those of any village in Massachusetts or Vermont…the bitterest abolition hole in the state.”

Greenlee Davidson of Virginia describes the town of Middletown MD

From Counter-Thrust From the Peninsula to the Antietam by Benjamin Franklin Cooling. Lincoln: University of Nebraska 2007. 200

“soul and body Union shriekers”

Greenlee Davidson

Davidson of Virginia describes the town of Middletown MD

From Counter-Thrust From the Peninsula to the Antietam by Benjamin Franklin Cooling. Lincoln: University of Nebraska 2007. 200

“we forget home [,] friends [,] in fact [,] everything but our duties as soldiers….You ask what you should do if I should be killed.  It is a hard question, but I have seen so many men killed and die in the last few weeks that I will give you the best advice I can. If I should be killed in battle or die while in the service, you as the wife of a 1st lieut will draw from the government, seventeen dollars per month for five years.  “

Henry B. Young

Sep 13 1862

Lt Young in a letter to his wife Delia 7 WI Inf

From  “I Dread the Thought of the Place.” by Scott D. Hartwig. Giants in Their Tall Black Hats – Essays on the Iron Brigade. Ed. Alan T. Nolan and Sharon Eggleston Vipond. Bloomington:  Indiana University Press, 1998.  31

Henry Young Papers, State Historical Society of Wisconsin

“We have been in ten battles and marched over one thousand miles.  The first battle was Cedar Run.  The second at Manassas Junction also three hard fightings on Bulls Run where the big fight was last year.  The sixth battle was at Ox Hill, the seventh at Harpers Ferry and the eighth] in Maryland.  We whip the enemy and drove them back every time with great slotter.  Our loss was not half as man as the enemy.  I will now quit the fighting subject and tell you of the crops.”

James E. Keever Oct 2 1862 of the 34th North Caroling Infantry recounts action since the Seven Days 34 NC Inf

From “The Net Result of the Campaign Was in Our Favor.” by Gary Gallagher.  The Antietam Campaign. Ed. Gary Gallagher  Chapel Hill:  The University of North Carolina Press,  1999. 23

James E. Keever to Alexander Keever, Oct 2 1862, in Elsie Keever, ed., Keever Civil War Letters (Lincolnton, N.C.: by the editor, 1989)

“General, I wish we could stand still and let the damned Yankees come to us!” James Longstreet

Longstreet to Lee protesting the further move of the Army from Boonsboro to Hagerstown

From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak.  Charleston:  The History Press, 2011.  24

Freeman, Douglas Southall. Lee’s Lieutenants. A Study in Command.  3 Volumes. New York:  Charles Cribner’s Sons, 1942-1944

“Our army returned to Va after this battle [Sharpsburg], as they were unprepared for an advance into Pennsylvania and could not be sustained in that unfriendly part of Maryland.”

Jane Howison Beale Oct 4 1862

Comments on the “tepid” response in Maryland

From “The Net Result of the Campaign Was in Our Favor.” by Gary Gallagher.  The Antietam Campaign. Ed. Gary Gallagher  Chapel Hill:  The University of North Carolina Press,  1999. 15

Beale, Jane Howison, The Journal of Jane Howison Beale of Fredericksburg, Virginia, 1850-1862, ed. Barbara P. Willis (Fredericksburg, Va: Historic Fredericksburg, 1979)

 

“…we are driven to protect our own country by transferring the seat of war to that of an enemy who pursues us with a relentless”

Jefferson Davis Sep 7 1862

From http://www.nps.gov/anti/historyculture/upload/Battle%20history.pdf

“We remained on the field until the next night after the fight when we fell back across the River leaving behind several of our dead [and] wounded among the rest.”

Jesse Steed McGee Sep 24 1862

Jesse Steed McGee  of 7th South Carolina talks about not being able to bring off all the wounded 7 SC Inf

From “The Net Result of the Campaign Was in Our Favor.” by Gary Gallagher.  The Antietam Campaign. Ed. Gary Gallagher  Chapel Hill:  The University of North Carolina Press,  1999. 24

Jesse Steed McGee to My dear Mollie, Sep 24 1862, in E.D. Sloan, ed., McGee-Charles Family Papers (1852-1924)(Greenville, SC: by the editor, [1996])

 

“never has the army been so dirty, ragged, and ill provided for as on this march.” From John R. Jones report on the Maryland Campaign

From The Maryland Campaign of September 1862 Vol. 1 South Mountain. Edited by Tom Clemens. New York:  Savas Beatie, 2010.108

OR 19 (1)

“In we bulged, our bands playing, and the boys yelling, as jolly as any who had gone before or any who came after us.”

John Stevens Sep 4 1862

Pvt John Stevens of the 5th Texas recounts the crossing of the Potomac on Sep 4, 1862   5 TX Inf

From “First Texas in the Cornfield.” by George E. Otott.  The Maryland Campaign of 1862 Civil War Regiments:  A Journal of the American Civil War. Vol 5, No 3. Campbell CA:  Savas Publishing Company, 1998. 75

Stevens, John W., Reminiscences of the Civil War (Hillsboro, 1982, reprint; orig. pub. 1902)

“We have confidence in Genl Lee in directing our operations, confidant of the justness of our cause.” John W. Harrison

Sep 9 1862

just after the army crossed the Potomac

From “The Net Result of the Campaign Was in Our Favor.” by Gary Gallagher.  The Antietam Campaign. Ed. Gary Gallagher  Chapel Hill:  The University of North Carolina Press,  1999. 28

John W. Harrison to his mother, Sep 9 1862, Confederate Miscellany, IA, folder 3, Robert Woodruff Library, Emory University, Atlanta GA

“[Victory after victory has crowned our arms and our gallant and victorious army [is] yet driving the enemy before us .  [May we continue to drive them until not a vestige of that invading army tramp on that soil, ever again tread upon southern soil." John W. Stone

a man from Lynchburg writing just before Sharpsburg

From "The Net Result of the Campaign Was in Our Favor." by Gary Gallagher.  The Antietam Campaign. Ed. Gary Gallagher  Chapel Hill:  The University of North Carolina Press,  1999. 17

John W. Stone to Julia A. Wood, Sept 22 1862, in Margaret Williams Bayne, ed., The Wood Family of Fluvanna County, Virginia, 1795-1969 (Norfolk, Va.: privately printed, 1984)

"Darned if I don't believe all the ice houses in western Maryland were emptied into this river last night."

Joseph. B. Polley

Polley of the Texas Brigade complains of the chill of the Potomac River as he crossed it.

From Counter-Thrust From the Peninsula to the Antietam by Benjamin Franklin Cooling. Lincoln: University of Nebraska 2007. 166

Polley, J.B, A Soldiers Letters to Charming Nellie (1908, rpt. Gaithersburg MD: Butternut Press, 1984)

"frigidity of welcome extended"

Joseph. B. Polley

Polley of the Texas Brigade complains about the chilly welcome of the Marylanders

From Counter-Thrust From the Peninsula to the Antietam by Benjamin Franklin Cooling. Lincoln: University of Nebraska 2007. 166

Polley, J.B, A Soldiers Letters to Charming Nellie (1908, rpt. Gaithersburg MD: Butternut Press, 1984)

"great disappointment over Maryland….There has been but little enthusiasm and few recruits.  Well, let the Old Bay State go, if her people had rather be slaves in the Union than masters in the Confederacy.  They must abide by their choice." Kate Stone Oct 2 1862

A Louisiana woman

From "The Net Result of the Campaign Was in Our Favor." by Gary Gallagher.  The Antietam Campaign. Ed. Gary Gallagher  Chapel Hill:  The University of North Carolina Press,  1999. 15

Stone, Kate, Brokenburn: The Journal of Kate Stone, 1861-1868, ed. John Q. Anderson (Baton Rouge:  Louisiana State University Press, 1955)

"Well, let the Old Bay State go, if her people had rather be slaves in the Union than masters in the Confederacy." Kate Stone

A southern woman on the lack of support by Maryland civilians

From "Maryland Our Maryland." by William A. Blair. The Antietam Campaign, Ed. Gary Gallagher Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1999. 92

Stone, Kate, Brokenburn: The Journal of Kate Stone, 1861-1868, ed. John Q. Anderson (Baton Rouge:  Louisiana State University Press, 1955)

"Our men do not grumble.  They only straggle."

Lafayette McLaws Sep 4 1862

McLaws to Lee shortly after his men join the Army of Northern Virginia

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. 44

McLaws to wife, Sept 4, 1862, McLaws Papers, Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

"Maryland has a few noble patriots in her limits, but as a state, she resembles Ephraim-she is tied to her idol, that g-l-o-r-i-o-u-s Union, and ought to be left alone."

Memphis Appeal

The newspaper on the status of Maryland

From Counter-Thrust From the Peninsula to the Antietam by Benjamin Franklin Cooling. Lincoln: University of Nebraska 2007. 261

"…I am more fully persuaded of the benefits which will result from an expedition into Maryland, and I shall proceed to make the movement at once, unless you should signify your disapprobation."

Robert E. Lee Sep 4 1862

Lee to Davis describing the need to move into Maryland in his second letter of Sep 4

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. 75

OR 19 (2)

"…your citizens have been arrested and imprisoned upon no charge and contrary to all forms of law.  The faithful and manly protest against this outrage made by the venerable and illustrious Marylander, to whom in better days no citizen appealed for right in vain, was treated with scorn and contempt; the government of your chief city has been usurped by armed strangers; your legislature has been dissolved by the unlawful arrest of its members; freedom of the press and of speech has been suppressed; words have been declared offenses by an arbitrary decree of the Federal Executive, and citizens ordered to be tried by a military commission for what they may dare to speak..."

Robert E. Lee Sep 8 1862

Excerpt from Lee's Proclamation to Marylanders

From The Maryland Campaign of September 1862 Vol. 1 South Mountain. Edited by Tom Clemens. New York:  Savas Beatie, 2010. 106

OR 19 (2)

"All will be right, if McLaws gets out of Pleasant Valley

Robert E. Lee Sep 16 1862

Lee to himself early on the morning of Sep 16 1862

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. 333

Carman, "Maryland Campaign," chap. 13

 

"As far as I can learn, the enemy are not moving in this direction, but continue to concentrate about Washington."

Robert E. Lee Sep 8 1862

Lee displays his ignorance of the whereabouts of the Federal Army in a letter to Jefferson Davis

From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak.  Charleston:  The History Press, 2011.  23

OR 51:1

"As long as the army of the enemy are employed on this frontier, I have no fears for the safety of Richmond." Robert E. Lee

Lee to Davis describing the need to move into Maryland

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. 61

Lee to Davis, Sept 3, OR vol 19, 2:590-91

 

"Before crossing the Potomac, I considered the advantages of entering Maryland east or west of the Blue Ridge.  In either case it was my intention to march upon this town [Hagerstown]“

Robert E. Lee

Sep 12 1862

Lee to Davis explaining his intentions to move on Hagerstown

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. 192

OR 19 (2)

“I had no intention of attacking him in his fortifications and am not prepared to invest them.” Robert E. Lee Sep 3 1862

Lee in a dispatch to Davis

From Counter-Thrust From the Peninsula to the Antietam by Benjamin Franklin Cooling. Lincoln: University of Nebraska 2007. 161

“if it is ever desired to give material aid to Maryland and afford her an opportunity of throwing off the oppression to which she is now subject, this would seem to be the most favorable.”

Robert E. Lee Sep 3 1862

Lee in a dispatch to Davis

From Counter-Thrust From the Peninsula to the Antietam by Benjamin Franklin Cooling. Lincoln: University of Nebraska 2007. 161

“It makes no difference to you, my man.  Keep up with your regiment.”

Robert E. Lee Sep 5 1862

While walking in Leesburg, Lee’s reply to a soldier who asked the distance to White’s Ford

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. 93

Harrison Family.  Memoirs. Typescript. Loudon Museum, Leesburg, Virginia

 

 “Let the armies of the East and the West vie with one another in discipline, bravery, and activity”

Robert E. Lee Sep 6 1862

Lee’s General Orders 103 announce the success of Kirby Smith at the Battle of Richmond in Kentucky

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. 106

OR 19 (2)

 

“not properly equipped for an invasion of an enemy’s territory.  It lacks much of the material of war, is feeble in transportation, the animals being much reduced, and the men poorly provided with clothes, and in thousands of instances are destitute of shoes.”

Robert E. Lee

Lee to Davis on invading Maryland

From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak.  Charleston:  The History Press, 2011.  17

OR 51:2

“not withstanding individual expressions of kindness that have been given, I do not anticipate any general rising of the people in our behalf.”

Robert E. Lee Sep 7 1862

Lee to Davis on the sympathies of the people of Maryland

From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak.  Charleston:  The History Press, 2011.  20

OR 51:1

“One of the greatest evils…is the habit of straggling from the ranks.  It has become a habit difficult to correct.  With some, the sick and feeble, it results from necessity, but with the greater number from design.  These latter do not wish to be with their regiments, not to share in their hardships and glories.  They are the cowards of the army [who] desert their comrades in times of danger.”

Robert E. Lee Sep 7 1862

Lee discussing the evils of straggling in a letter to Davis

From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak.  Charleston:  The History Press, 2011.  20

OR 51:1

“Should the results of the expedition justify it, I propose to enter Pennsylvania, unless you should deem it unadvisable upon political or other grounds.”

Robert E. Lee Sep 4 1862

Lee to Davis describing the need to move into Maryland in his second letter of Sep 4

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. 77

OR 19 (2)

“stragglers are usually those who desert their comrades in peril…unworthy members of an army which has immortalized itself.”

Robert E. Lee Sep 4 1862

General Order 102

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999.74

OR 19 (1)

“such criticisms were obvious, but the disparity of force between the contending armies rendered the risks unavoidable.”

Robert E. Lee

Lee after the war in response to critics who charged him with incurring too great risks

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. 428

Allan William.  The Army of Northern Virginia in 1862 (Dayton, Ohio:  Morningside House, 1984

“The advance of the Federal Army was so slow at the time we left Fredericktown as to justify the belief that the reduction of Harper’s Ferry could be accomplished and our troops concentrated before they would be called upon to meet it.”

Robert E. Lee

Lee’s Report on the Maryland Campaign

From Cavalryman of the Lost Cause by Jeffry D. Wert.  New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. 143

OR 19 (1)

“the enemy was advancing more rapidly than was convenient from Fredericktown”

Robert E. Lee Sep 16 1862

Lee to Davis describing the situation after South Mountain

From The Maryland Campaign of September 1862 Vol. 1 South Mountain. Edited by Tom Clemens. New York:  Savas Beatie, 2010. 369

OR 19 (1)

“The present seems the most propitious time since the commencement of the war to enter Maryland.”

Robert E. Lee

Sep 3 1862

Lee to Davis

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. 57

Lee to Davis, Sept 3, OR vol 19, 2:590-91

 

“The proposal of peace would enable the people of the United States to determine at their coming elections whether they will support those who favor a prolongation of the war, or those who wish to bring it to a termination, which can but be productive of good to both parties without affecting the honor of either.”

Robert E. Lee Sep 8 1862

Lee to Davis that discusses political matters.  From Frederick MD

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. 127

OR 19 (2)

“The war was thus transferred from the interior to the frontier.”

Robert E. Lee

Lee’s Report on the Maryland Campaign

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. 15

Lee, Robert Edward, The Wartime Papers of R.E. Lee, ed. Clifford Dowdey and Louis Manarin (Boston: Little, Brown, 1961)

 

“to detain the enemy upon the northern frontier until the approach of winter.”

Robert E. Lee Sep 4 1862

Lee to Davis describing the need to move into Maryland in his second letter of Sep 4

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. 76

OR 19 (2)

 

“[if we had of had our 30 thousand stragglers engaged we would have been in Baltimore by this time."

Sanford W. Branch

Sep 30 1862

Sanford Branch of the 8th Georgia on straggling  8 GA Inf

From "The Net Result of the Campaign Was in Our Favor." by Gary Gallagher.  The Antietam Campaign. Ed. Gary Gallagher  Chapel Hill:  The University of North Carolina Press,  1999. 26

Sanford W. Branch to his mother, Sep 30, 1862 in Joslyn, Charlotte's Boys

"more than two thirds of the people are Union…I don't want to stop in Maryland five minutes longer than I can help."

Thomas Garber

a man in the 12th VA informed his wife  12VA Inf

From Cavalryman of the Lost Cause by Jeffry D. Wert.  New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. 141

Thomas Garber to sister Sep 17 1862

 

"I will join you at Sharpsburg."

Thomas Jackson Sep 15 1862

Jackson to Lee

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. 318

"We obviously have no friends in this town."

Thomas Jackson Sep 10 1862

While passing through Middletown MD, Jackson's response to two young girls who waved American flags at Stonewall.

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. 175

Duncan, Richard. "Marylanders and the Invasion of 1862." Civil War History 9 (1965)

"[Marylanders] who practiced the disreputable & unmannerly habit of shooting at Confed. soldiers from windows.”

Walter Taylor Sep 21 1862

Taylor on Marylanders

From “The Net Result of the Campaign Was in Our Favor.” by Gary Gallagher.  The Antietam Campaign. Ed. Gary Gallagher  Chapel Hill:  The University of North Carolina Press,  1999. 27

Walter Taylor to Mary Lousia Taylor, Sep 21 1862, in Taylor, Lee’s Adjutant

 

“As soon as we came in sight of the Potomac the boys gave one of the loudest and most protracted & glorious shouts you ever heard.  We crossed by moonlight and the whole scene was one of the most inspiring I have ever witnessed.”

William G. Deloney Sep 10 1862

Deloney of Cobbs Legion describing entry into Maryland

From Cavalryman of the Lost Cause by Jeffry D. Wert.  New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. 141

William G. Deloney-My Dear Rosa, Sep 10, 1862, Deloney Family Papers, UGA

 

“We marched through several towns in Maryland and through fine farms and stopped at Frederick City, Md., on the Monocacy river, remained there one day and washed our clothes in the river and put them on wet. We were trying to drown some of the lice of which we had plenty. We had not washed our clothes in about a month, and the bugs were getting unbearable.”

William Judkin

Judkin of the 22d Georgia recalls the march through Maryland    22GA Inf

From “The Confederate Soldier in the Maryland Campaign.” by John Miller [online] War Returns to South Mountain. March 7, 2011. Retrieved from http://montereypass.blogspot.com/

Suffice it that General Lee seems well to understand what he is about.  Yankeedom seems a good deal stirred up.”

William Nelson Pendleton Sep 10 1862

William Pendleton in a letter

From “We Don’t Know What on Earth to Do with Him-William Nelson Pendleton.”by Peter S. Carmichael. The Antietam Campaign. Ed. Gary Gallagher. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1999. 264

Lee, Susan P, Memoirs of William Nelson Pendleton, D.D. (1893; reprint, Harrisonburg Va.: Sprinkle Publications, 1991

“Well it is the prettiest country I ever saw, but as for enjoyment I don’t want to go any more & I think we had better let (md) alone for she seems joined to her Idols (‘Union’).”

William R. Montgomery  Oct 4 1862

Montgomery of the 2nd South Carolina on Marylanders    2 SC Inf

From “The Net Result of the Campaign Was in Our Favor.” by Gary Gallagher.  The Antietam Campaign. Ed. Gary Gallagher  Chapel Hill:  The University of North Carolina Press,  1999. 27

William R. Montgomery to his brother, oct 4 1862, in William R. Montgomery, Georgia Sharpshooter: The Civil War Diary and Letters of William Rhadamanthus Montgomery, 1839-1906, ed. George Montgomery Jr. (Macon, GA: Mercer University Press, 1997

UNION QUOTES

“Ireland in her worst straits could present no parallel.”

a Federal correspondent describing the condition of the Confederate Army in the Maryland Campaign.  Mason,136; 10 SHSP., 508

From R.E. Lee A Biography by Douglas Southall Freeman.  New York Scribners, 1934.

“Goodness gracious, look at the Seceshes.  I’ve been to shows and circuses and theaters and all them things, but I never seen such a sight’n all my life.”

A Marylander watching the rebels emerging from the Potomac River into Maryland

From Counter-Thrust From the Peninsula to the Antietam by Benjamin Franklin Cooling. Lincoln: University of Nebraska 2007. 165

“the dirtiest men I ever saw, a most ragged, lean, and hungry set of wolves.”

A young Marylander reports on the entrance of the Rebels into Maryland

From Our Boys Did Nobly Schuylkill County Pennsylvania, Soldiers at the Battles of South Mountain and Antietam by John David Hoptak.  John David Hoptak, 2009. 55

Sears, Stephen.  Landscape Turned Red:  The Battle of Antietam. ( New Haven, Connecticut:  Ticknor & Fields, 1983

 

“While on the sidewalk we could look over on the lawn in front of the White House.  It was as thickly strewn with played out soldiers as was possible for them to lie.  We could see the tall form of the President (“Old Abe,” as we called him) in shirt sleeves, water pail and dipper in hand, stepping over and among the boys lying around all over the grounds, giving them water to drink.”

A Wisconsin man Sep 5 1862

A Wisconsin man witnesses Abraham Lincoln giving water to troops hurrying forward in the Maryland Campaign while in DC.   6 WI Inf

From “They Must Be Made of Iron.” by Kent Gramm. Giants in Their Tall Black Hats – Essays on the Iron Brigade. Ed. Alan T. Nolan and Sharon Eggleston Vipond. Bloomington:  Indiana University Press, 1998.  15

Cheek, Philip and Mair Pointon. History of the Sauk County Riflemen, Known As Company “A”, Sixth Wisconsin Veteran Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865. Gaithersburg: Butternut Press, 1909.

 

“Cant you beat them some more before they get off?”

Abraham Lincoln in a wire to General McClellan immediately after South Mountain

From Counter-Thrust From the Peninsula to the Antietam by Benjamin Franklin Cooling. Lincoln: University of Nebraska 2007. 272

“It seems unreasonable that a series of successes, extending through half-a-year, and clearing more than a hundred thousand square miles of country, should help us so little, while a single half-defeat should hurt us so much.”

Abraham Lincoln alluding to the lack of Northern appreciation of the Federal triumphs in the West in the spring and summer of 1862.

From “A Season of Opportunity.” by Gary W. Gallagher. Antietam – Essays on the 1862 Maryland Campaign. Ed by Gary Gallagher  Kent OH:  Kent State University Press, 1989. 2

“Suffice it to say that for over three weeks we have been scarcely a day without marching-for at least seven days without rations.”

Alpheus Williams on the hard marching in the summer of 62

From  “Who Would Not Be A Soldier?” by Scott D. Hartwig. The Antietam Campaign. Ed. Gary Gallagher  Chapel Hill:  The University of North Carolina Press,  1999.  145

Williams, Alpheus.  From the Cannon’s Mouth, ed. Milo M Quaife. Detroit:  Wayne State University Press, 1959

 

“the smoke of the cannonading on the mountains across the valley as we came down into Frederick.”

Andrew E. Ford

A view of the cavalry skirmishing on Catoctin Mt in the distance.    15  MA Inf

From Unfurl Those Colors! McClellan, Sumner, & The Second Army Corps in the Antietam Campaign by Marion Armstrong. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2008. 107

Ford, Andrew E. The Story of the Fifteenth Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry in the Civil War, 1861-1865. Clinton MA: Press of W.J. Coulter, 1898.

 

“A large wagon train-judge 50-75 wagons, moving out from Leesburg, easterly, in direction of Edwards Ferry.  Continuous clouds of dust seen on roads leading in & out of Leesburg.  A large wagon park 4 to 6 miles southeast of Leesburg, near turnpike.  The enemy are now shelling the aqueduct over Monocacy river, and I judge are attempting to cross, from the reports of musketry heard.”

Brinkerhoff N. Miner Sep 4 1862

Lt Miner of the Signal Corps makes this report from the Sugar Loaf signal station to a colleague in Poolesville

From The Secret War for the Union by Edwin C. Fishel. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1996.  211

RG 98, Office of the Chief Signal Officer, Telegrams of the Army of the Potomac, NA.

“a field of ripe potatoes was discovered close by, and notwithstanding McClellan’s savage order against taking anything, in a short time that field had upon it almost a man to a hill of potatoes.”

Charles A. Fuller Sep 14 1862

The discovery of a hill of potatoes  61  NY Inf

From Unfurl Those Colors! McClellan, Sumner, & The Second Army Corps in the Antietam Campaign by Marion Armstrong. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2008. 117

Fuller, Charles A. Personal Reflections of the War of 1861.  Sherburne, NY:  News Job, 1906

“Our landlady, who is a strong Union woman, ways she was obliged to let them have a number of pounds of honey, and to take their worthless money for it.  But she put on a price according, and then sold half the bills to a secessionist neighbor who is foolish enough to believe that Lee will be back within a week, and in that way got the full value of her money.”

Charles S. Wainright Sep 17 1862

Wainwright in Frederick on Sep 17 reports on the sentiment of a Frederick woman

From A Diary of Battle The Personal Journals of Colonel Charles S. Wainright 1861-1865 by Charles S. Wainwright edited by Allan Nevins. New York:  De Capo Press, 1998.  100

“Saw quite a number of rebel prisoners at the Court House, a very thin, shabby and dirty set, but much more hardy and lively looking than our men.”

Charles S. Wainright Sep 17 1862

Wainwright reporting on the Confederate prisoners in Frederick

From A Diary of Battle The Personal Journals of Colonel Charles S. Wainright 1861-1865 by Charles S. Wainwright edited by Allan Nevins. New York:  De Capo Press, 1998. 100

“The road led over the Catoctin Mountains, and was narrow, rough, stony, steep, and muddy pretty much of the whole way.”

Charles S. Wainright Jun 26 1863

Wainwright describing the march over Catoctin Mt near Jefferson.

From A Diary of Battle The Personal Journals of Colonel Charles S. Wainright 1861-1865 by Charles S. Wainwright edited by Allan Nevins. New York:  De Capo Press, 1998. 215

“There is a difference between the people of Maryland and those of Pennsylvania.  A man of some fifty or more stood looking at our men pull down the fences to start our breastworks, and carrying off the sheaves of wheat just cut here for their beds.  Having a fellow-feeling for the owner as a brotherly farmer, I spoke to the man and said it was hard on the owner of the land to destroy his crops and fences so. ‘Oh’ says he, ‘you may destroy my whole farm if you will only whip the rebels.’  If the eastern Marylanders are the most bitter of the rebels, those west of Frederick are the truest Union people I have met with anywhere.  This same willingness to sacrifice and give was apparent through this country in the Antietam campaign as well as in this one; their kindness was shown to the men as well before as after our victories.”

Charles S. Wainright Jul 10 1863

Wainright on the civilians of Maryland

From A Diary of Battle The Personal Journals of Colonel Charles S. Wainright 1861-1865 by Charles S. Wainwright edited by Allan Nevins. New York:  De Capo Press, 1998.  258

“a land where fresh vegetables and poultry were not rare…wood and water were easy to find, instead of requiring weary searches at the end of a weary day.”

Francis W. Palfrey of the 20th Mass describes the advance into Maryland

20  MA Inf

From Unfurl Those Colors! McClellan, Sumner, & The Second Army Corps in the Antietam Campaign by Marion Armstrong. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2008. 72

Palfrey, Francis Winthrop. The Antietam and Fredericksburg. Vol 5, Campaigns of the Civil War. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1882.

 

“There was abundant evidence of their presence in the filth they left uncovered, for they had slaughtered beef for their troops and the putrid offal therefrom [sic] was polluting the air.  Still there we had to sleep.”

Frederick L. Hitchcock

Description of a camp near Urbanna formerly occupied by the Confederates

132 PA Inf

From Unfurl Those Colors! McClellan, Sumner, & The Second Army Corps in the Antietam Campaign by Marion Armstrong. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2008. 103

Hitchcock, Frederick L. War from the Inside: The Story of the 132nd Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry in the War for the Supression of the Rebellion, 1862-1863. Philadaelphia: J.B. Lippincott, 1904; reprint, Alexandria: Time-Life Books, 1985.

“crossed a commanding range of hills southeast of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad spanning the Monocacy river [and] beheld the church-spired city of Frederick and the broad, fertile and opulent valley of the Monocacy, shut in by low mountains of surpassing grace and outline, with all nature abloom,-a scene in the fierce sunlight of enchanting beauty.”

George A. Bruce

The first view of Frederick by soldiers of the Second Corps  20  MA Inf

From Unfurl Those Colors! McClellan, Sumner, & The Second Army Corps in the Antietam Campaign by Marion Armstrong. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2008. 107

Bruce, George A. The Twentieth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry 1861-1865. Boston: Houghton , Mifflin and Company, 1906.

 

“the roads of red clay…soft and slippery as grease.”

George A. Bruce

description of the roads in western Maryland   20  MA Inf

From Unfurl Those Colors! McClellan, Sumner, & The Second Army Corps in the Antietam Campaign by Marion Armstrong. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2008. 103

Bruce, George A. The Twentieth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry 1861-1865. Boston: Houghton , Mifflin and Company, 1906.

 

“[I] found the union sentiment much stronger in this region than I had expected, [with people] disposed to be very kind & polite to me.”

George B. McClellan

McClellan in a letter to his wife describing the friendship of the residents of Clarksburg MD

From Counter-Thrust From the Peninsula to the Antietam by Benjamin Franklin Cooling. Lincoln: University of Nebraska 2007.

“All evidence that has been accumulated from various sources since we left Washington goes to prove most conclusively that almost the entire rebel army in Virginia, amounting to not less than 120,000 men, is in the vicinity of Frederick City.

George B. McClellan

Sep 11 1862

McClellan letter to Halleck from Rockville MD

From The Maryland Campaign of September 1862 Vol. 1 South Mountain. Edited by Tom Clemens. New York:  Savas Beatie, 2010. 183

OR 19 (2)

“bear comparison with the ruin and disasters which would follow a signal defeat of this army. Everything seems to indicate that [the Confederates] intend to hazard all upon the coming battle.  You may be sure that I will follow them as closely as I can, and fight them whenever I can find them.”

George B. McClellan Sep 10 1862

McClellan in a letter to Gov Curtin of Pennsylvania

From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak.  Charleston:  The History Press, 2011.   29

McClellan, George B. The Civil War Papers of George B. McClellan. Ed. Stephen W. Sears. New York: Ticknor & Fields, 1989.

“Evidence that has been accumulated from various sources since we left Washington goes to prove most conclusively that the entire rebel army in Virginia amounting to not less than 120,000 men, is in the vicinity of Frederick…If we should be defeated the consequences to the country would be disastrous in the extreme.”

George B. McClellan Sep 11 1862

McClellan to Halleck on Confederate strength in western Maryland

From “I Fought the Battle Splendidly.” by Wilson A. Greene. Antietam – Essays on the 1862 Maryland Campaign. Ed. Gary Gallagher  Kent OH:  Kent State University Press, 1989.  60

“From all I can gather secesh is skeddadelling…I begin to think that he is making off to get out of the scrape by recrossing the river at Williamsport…He evidently don’t want to fight me for some reason or other.”

George B. McClellan Sep 12 1862

McClellan to his wife describing the advance into Maryland

From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak.  Charleston:  The History Press, 2011.   30

McClellan, George B. The Civil War Papers of George B. McClellan. Ed. Stephen W. Sears. New York: Ticknor & Fields, 1989.

“Had Gen. Lee remained in front of Washington it would have been the part of wisdom to hold our army quiet until its pressing wants were fully supplied, its organization restored, and its ranks filled with recruits….But as the enemy maintained the offensive…it became necessary to meet him at any cost…and throw him back across the Potomac….It must be borne constantly in mind that the purpose of advancing from Washington was simply to meet the necessities of the moment by frustrating Lee’s invasion of the Northern States, and when that was accomplished, to push with the utmost rapidity the work of reorganization and supply….

George B. McClellan

McClellan’s memoirs and his objectives in the Maryland Campaign

From “I Fought the Battle Splendidly.” by Wilson A. Greene. Antietam – Essays on the 1862 Maryland Campaign. Ed. Gary Gallagher  Kent OH:  Kent State University Press, 1989. 82

“I can’t describe to you for want of time the enthusiastic reception we met with yesterday at Frederick, I was nearly overwhelmed and pulled to pieces.”

George B. McClellan Sep 14 1862

McClellan to his wife describing his entrance into Frederick

From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak.  Charleston:  The History Press, 2011.  30

McClellan, George B. The Civil War Papers of George B. McClellan. Ed. Stephen W. Sears. New York: Ticknor & Fields, 1989.

 

“I have only time to say good morning this bright sunny Sunday, & then start to the front to try to relieve Harper’s Ferry, which is sorely pressed by secesh.  It is probable that we shall have a serious engagement today & perhaps a general battle.”

George B. McClellan Sep 14 1862

McClellan to his wife on the morning of the battle of South Mountain

From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak.  Charleston:  The History Press, 2011.  43

McClellan, George B. The Civil War Papers of George B. McClellan. Ed. Stephen W. Sears. New York: Ticknor & Fields, 1989.

“If we should be defeated, the consequences to the country would be disastrous in the extreme.”

George B. McClellan Sep 11 1862

McClellan to Halleck describing the significance of the next battle with Lee

From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak.  Charleston:  The History Press, 2011.  28

McClellan, George B. The Civil War Papers of George B. McClellan. Ed. Stephen W. Sears. New York: Ticknor & Fields, 1989.

“My columns are pushing on rapidly to Frederick.  I feel perfectly confidant that the enemy has abandoned Frederick, moving in two directions, viz., on the Hagerstown and Harpers Ferry roads.”

George B. McClellan Sep 12 1862

McClellan in a telegraph to Washington describing Lees apparent dividing of his army

From Lee’s Maverick General Daniel Harvey Hill by Hal Bridges.  Lincoln:  University of Nebraska Press, 1961. 94

OR 19 (2)

“Nothing but sheer necessity justified the advance of the Army of the Potomac to South Mountain and Antietam in its then condition and it is to the eternal honor of the men who composed it that under such adverse circumstances they gained those victories…It must then be borne constantly in mind that the purpose of advancing from Washington was simply to meet the necessities of the moment by frustrating Lee’s invasion of the Northern States, and when that was accomplished, to push with the utmost rapidity the work of reorganization and supply so that a new campaign might be promptly inaugurated with the army in condition to prosecute it to a successful termination without intermission.”

George B. McClellan

McClellan’s mind set on the condition of the army

From The Maryland Campaign of September 1862 Vol. 1 South Mountain. Edited by Tom Clemens. New York:  Savas Beatie, 2010. 420

“The purpose of advancing from Washington was simply to meet the necessities of he moment by frustrating Lee’s invasion of the Northern States, and, when that was accomplished, to push with the utmost rapidity the work of reorganization and supply, so that a new campaign might be promptly inaugurated with the army in condition to prosecute it to a successful termination without intermission.”

George B. McClellan

McClellan in his memoirs  retrospectively describes his understanding of the task before him in the Maryland Campaign

From Counter-Thrust From the Peninsula to the Antietam by Benjamin Franklin Cooling. Lincoln: University of Nebraska 2007. 185

“upon the success of this Army the fate of nation depends.”

George B. McClellan

McClellan to Halleck describing the significance of the next battle with Lee

From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak.  Charleston:  The History Press, 2011.  28

Rafuse, Ethan S.  McClellan’s War: The Failure of Moderation in the Struggle for the Union.  Bloomington IN:  Indiana University Press, 2005.

“We are well & the entire army is now united, cheerful & confident. You need not fear the result for I believe that God will give us the victory.”

George B. McClellan Sep 7 1862

McClellan to his wife describing the advance into Maryland

From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak.  Charleston:  The History Press, 2011.  28

McClellan, George B. The Civil War Papers of George B. McClellan. Ed. Stephen W. Sears. New York: Ticknor & Fields, 1989.

“Whatever the opinions of the Marylanders may be-and we hope they are sound and loyal-they had no more chance of ‘rising’ than the convicts in a well-ordered penitentiary.”

Harpers Weekly Sep 27 1862

A northern editor on the chances of Maryland leaving the Union

From “Maryland Our Maryland.” by William A. Blair. The Antietam Campaign, Ed. Gary Gallagher Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1999. 91

Harpers Weekly Sep 27 1862

 

“To the right and to the left of us was a beautiful valley. A silver stream of medium size ran through each valley as far as the eye can reach, and it happened to be one of the clearest fourteenth of September days you can imagine. Two or three small town lay in each valley with their white church towers, and about twelve o’clock the bells rang out joyfully.”

Henry Gerrish Sep 14 1862

Description of the approach to the Middletown Valley   7 NY Inf

From Unfurl Those Colors! McClellan, Sumner, & The Second Army Corps in the Antietam Campaign by Marion Armstrong. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2008. 119

Gerrish, Henry “Seventh New York Infantry Regiment Memoirs,” TMs (photocopy0, pp. 25-26, Civil War Times Illustrated Collection, Military History Institute, Carlisle Barracks, PA

“Things look blue”

Henry Keiser

Sgt Keiser on the state of affairs as Lee invades Maryland  96 PA Inf

From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak.  Charleston:  The History Press, 2011.  15

Keiser, Henrym Ayg 31 1862, Sergeants Diary, Sep 23 1861-July 20 1865, Harrisburg CWRT Collection. United States Army Heritage Education Center, Carlisle, PA.

“It had halted for the simple reason that there was no longer anyone there to march

James P. Sullivan

A soldier describes the forced marches early in the Maryland Campaign

From “They Must Be Made of Iron.” by Kent Gramm. Giants in Their Tall Black Hats – Essays on the Iron Brigade. Ed. Alan T. Nolan and Sharon Eggleston Vipond. Bloomington:  Indiana University Press, 1998.  15

Beaudot, William J.K.  and Lance J. Herdegen. An Irishman in the Iron Brigade: The Civil War Memoirs of James P. Sullivan, Sergt., Company K, 6th Wisconsin Volunteers. New York: Fordham University Press, 1993

“We refitted there, drew clothing, shoes, etc., and the next day plenty of supplies came up from Washington.”

Janvrin W. Gravins

Capt Gravins of the 5th NH recalls provisioning of the Second Corps at Tennallytown before heading north   5 NH INF

From Unfurl Those Colors! McClellan, Sumner, & The Second Army Corps in the Antietam Campaign by Marion Armstrong. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2008. 85

Child, William. A History of the Fifth Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteers in the American Civil War, 1861-1865. Bristol, NH: R.W. Musgrove, Printer, 1893. Reprint, Gaithersburg, MD: Ron R. Van Sickle Military Books, 1988.

 

“Like the pendulum of a clock, or the ever rattling tongue of woman (some) or in illustration of perpetual motion, we have been going-moving [on] hardtack and salt horse, through a heavy rain and desperate roads, [while] my fatigue baffles all description.”

John B. Bashler

Surgeon John Bashler of the 81st Pennsylvania recalls the pursuit of Lee into Maryland   81 PA Inf

From Counter-Thrust From the Peninsula to the Antietam by Benjamin Franklin Cooling. Lincoln: University of Nebraska 2007. 194

“our march through Maryland was delightful; the farther we got into the interior the more loyal the people became, and our welcome was cordial.”

John G. B. Adams

Lt Adams of the 19th Massachusetts describes the march into Maryland

19 MA Inf

From Unfurl Those Colors! McClellan, Sumner, & The Second Army Corps in the Antietam Campaign by Marion Armstrong. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2008. 71

Adams, John G.B. Reminiscences of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment. Boston: Wright & Potter Pringint Company, 1899.

 

“Our entry into the city was triumphal.  The stars and stripes floated from every building and hung from every window.  The joyful people ran through the streets to greet and cheer the veterans of the Army of the Potomac.  Little children stood at nearly every door, freely offering cool water, cakes, pies and dainties.  The jibes and insults of the women of Virginia, to which our men had become accustomed, had here a striking contrast in a generous and enthusiastic welcome by the ladies of Frederick City.”

John Gibbon Sep 14 1862

Gibbon describes the arrival of the Iron Brigade in Frederick City

From “They Must Be Made of Iron.” by Kent Gramm. Giants in Their Tall Black Hats – Essays on the Iron Brigade. Ed. Alan T. Nolan and Sharon Eggleston Vipond. Bloomington:  Indiana University Press, 1998.  16

Gibbon, John. “Antietam Eighteen Years After.” Milwaukee Sunday Telegraph (5 December 1880)

“Very soon, news of what we were doing spread and the stragglers began to disappear from the sides of the road in our vicinity.  What was of more importance to my command, a strong spirit of opposition to straggling was created and it became an honorable ambition to remain in the ranks, instead of constantly inventing pretexts to fall out.”

John Gibbon

From “They Must Be Made of Iron.” by Kent Gramm. Giants in Their Tall Black Hats – Essays on the Iron Brigade. Ed. Alan T. Nolan and Sharon Eggleston Vipond. Bloomington:  Indiana University Press, 1998.  15

Gibbon, John. Recollections of the Civil War (1928 reprint; Dayton, Ohio: Morningside, 1988

“as the full ranks of Sumner’s brigades, in perfect order and with all the pomp of war, passed through the quaint and beautiful town, their proud commanders and glittering staffs, and General Sumner at the head, the inhabitants responded with applause, and, from balcony and windows fair faces smiled and handkerchiefs and scarf’s waved to greet the army of the Union, as they passed along the streets from which, only the day before, the Confederates had been driven.”

John H. Rhodes Sep 13 1862

Sgt John Rhodes of Franks battery describes the entry of the Union Army into Frederick

B/1 Franks  RI Arty

From Unfurl Those Colors! McClellan, Sumner, & The Second Army Corps in the Antietam Campaign by Marion Armstrong. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2008.  108

Rhodes, John H. The History of Battery B, First Regiment Rhode Island Light Artillery in the War to Preserve the Union, 1861-1865. Providence: Snow and Farnham, Printers, 1904.

“the enemy means to make trouble in Maryland.”

John Pope Sep 2, 1862

Pope in a dispatch to Halleck Sep 2 1862

From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak.  Charleston:  The History Press, 2011.  27

OR 12 (3)

“for its length and rapidity has not been equaled in this war; in thirty-six hours we made fifty miles, and after a rest of a few hours twenty-five miles more.”

John Sedgwick in a letter to his sister describes the fatiguing marches early in the Maryland Campaign

From Unfurl Those Colors! McClellan, Sumner, & The Second Army Corps in the Antietam Campaign by Marion Armstrong. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2008. 71

Sedgwick, John, Correspondence of John Sedgwick, Major-General, 2 vols. New York: De Vinne Press, Printed for Carl and Ellen Battle Stoeckel, 1902-1903.

 

“Bands played, then men stepped out with that veteran swing which is only acquired by troops after long and continuous campaigning, and the Army of the Potomac seemed to be itself again.”

Joseph J. Bartlett of the VI Corps describes the advance of the Army of the Potomac into Maryland

From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak.  Charleston:  The History Press, 2011.  28

Bartlett, Joseph Jackson. “Crampton’s Pass: The Start of the Great Maryland Campaign.” National Tribune, Dec 19, 1889

“as we entered the main street the drums sounded attention, and the troops marched in regular order, with bands playing and colors flying….This was the first real opportunity we have had of showing off to our grateful countrywomen, and we made the most of it, displaying our horsemanship to the best advantage.””

Josiah Marshall Favill Sep 13 1862

Favill describes the entry of the 57th NY into Frederick 57 NY Inf

From Unfurl Those Colors! McClellan, Sumner, & The Second Army Corps in the Antietam Campaign by Marion Armstrong. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2008. 107

Favill, Josiah M.  The Diary of a Young Officer Serving in the Armies of the United States during the War of the Rebellion.  Chigago:  Donnelley, 1909.

 

“Crowds of women and youngsters surrounded us, offering fruit, flowers, and water, and gazed with admiration at our dress and accoutrements. We took kindly to the glory of finding ourselves the heroes of the hour and reciprocated the crowd’s interest, parting with many of our buttons to the prettiest girls.”

Josiah Marshall Favill

Lt Favill describes the fatiguing marches early in the Maryland Campaign

57 NY Inf

From Unfurl Those Colors! McClellan, Sumner, & The Second Army Corps in the Antietam Campaign by Marion Armstrong. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2008. 72

Favill, Josiah M.  The Diary of a Young Officer Serving in the Armies of the United States during the War of the Rebellion.  Chigago:  Donnelley, 1909.

 

“interrupted constantly by the breakdown of wagons, as well as by stragglers and invalids.”

Josiah Marshall Favill

Lt Favill describes the fatiguing marches early in the Maryland Campaign

57 NY Inf

From Unfurl Those Colors! McClellan, Sumner, & The Second Army Corps in the Antietam Campaign by Marion Armstrong. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2008. 71

Favill, Josiah M.  The Diary of a Young Officer Serving in the Armies of the United States during the War of the Rebellion.  Chigago:  Donnelley, 1909.

 

“They were the dirtiest men I ever saw, a most ragged, lean, and hungry set of wolves.  Yet there was a dash about them that the Northern men lacked.  They rode like circus riders.  Many of them were from the far South and spoke a dialect I could scarcely understand.  They were profane beyond belief and talked incessantly.”

Leighton Parks describes the Rebel invaders of Maryland

From R.E. Lee A Biography by Douglas Southall Freeman.  New York Scribners, 1934.

Parks, Leighton.  “What a Boy Saw of the Civil War” Century Magazine, vol 70 no2

“A dirtier, filthier, a more unsavory set of human beings never strolled through a town….These were the deliverers of Maryland from Lincoln’s oppressive yoke.”

Lewis H. Steiner

Frederick resident, Dr. Lewis Steiner of the US Sanitary Commission observes the rebel invaders of Frederick

From Counter-Thrust From the Peninsula to the Antietam by Benjamin Franklin Cooling. Lincoln: University of Nebraska 2007. 197

Cottom, Robert L. and Mary Ellen Hayward. Maryland in te Civil War-A House Divided. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994.

“The all believe in themselves as well as their generals and are terribly in earnest.  They assert that they have never been whipped, but have driven the Yankees before them whenever they could find them.”

Lewis H. Steiner

A union surgeon would have a chance to observe the ANV and talk to his soldiers.  He records this in his diary

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. 45

Steiner, Lewis Henry, Report of Lewis H. Steiner, M.D. Inspector of the Sanitary Commission, Containing a Diary Kept during the Rebel Occupation of Frederick, Md. (New York: Anson D.F. Randolph, 1862)

 

“their friends were anxious to get rid of them and of the penetrating ammoniacal smell they brought with them.”

Lewis H. Steiner Sep 10 1862

Steiner watches the reaction of the citizens as the Confederate Army left Frederick

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. 171

Steiner, Lewis Henry, Report of Lewis H. Steiner, M.D. Inspector of the Sanitary Commission, Containing a Diary Kept during the Rebel Occupation of Frederick, Md. (New York: Anson D.F. Randolph, 1862)

 

“I may mention the ‘smiling plenty’ of the Maryland farms, and the hearty welcome accorded to us on our route by the inhabitants, afforded a decided and pleasant contrast to the many scenes of desolation and ruin through which we have recently passed.”

Robert Davidson Oct 2 1862

Pvt Robert Davidson in his letter to the Scottish-American Journal about the advance of the 79th NY throught the Maryland countryside during the Maryland Campaign 79 NY Inf

From “The 79th New York Highlanders in the Maryland Campaign.”by Terry Johnson. The Maryland Campaign of 1862 and its Aftermath, Civil War Regiments Vol 6 No. 2. Campell CA:  Savas Publishing Company, 1998. 63

Scottish-American Journal, Oct 2 1862

 

“My eyes could hardly believe what they beheld there. The ‘Stars and Stripes’ were flying from every house and the people could not do enough for us, the were so overjoyed to be delivered from the rebel hordes that occupied the place.”

Thomas M. Aldrich Sep 13 1862

Thomas Aldrich of Tompkins Battery describes the entry into Frederick.

A/1 Tompkins RI Arty

From Unfurl Those Colors! McClellan, Sumner, & The Second Army Corps in the Antietam Campaign by Marion Armstrong. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2008. 108

Aldrich, Thomas M. The History of Battery A, First Regiment Rhode Island Light Artillery in the War to Preserve the Union, 1861-1865. Providence: Snow and Farnham, Printers, 1904.

“marches were not at that time very long nor forced; the country through which the army moved was very picturesque and fruitful; the fields were filled with corn, and from these the soldiers had many delicious meals,…not seldom supping upon fresh pork (purchased of course of the country people.)”

William Osborne of the 29th Massachusetts describes the march into Maryland 29 MA Inf

From Unfurl Those Colors! McClellan, Sumner, & The Second Army Corps in the Antietam Campaign by Marion Armstrong. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2008. 97

Osborne, William A.  The History of the Twenty-Ninth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry in the late War of the Rebellion.  Boston:  Albert J. Wright, 1877.

“We were in ‘God’s Country’ now, and the change from Virginia was a pleasant one; the roads were good, the weather fine, and the men cheerful.”

William Todd

Corporal William Todd, historian of the 79th describes the advance into Maryland 79 NY Inf

From “The 79th New York Highlanders in the Maryland Campaign.” The Maryland Campaign of 1862 and its Aftermath, Civil War Regiments Vol 6 No. 2. Campell CA:  Savas Publishing Company, 1998. 63

Todd, William, The Seventy Ninth Highlanders:  New York Volunteeers, 1861-1865 (Albany, 1886)

2 Responses

  1. Jim,

    Thanks very much for all this work!

    Looks like this quote is in OR, vol. 19, pt. 2, 600-601.

    Larry

    “As far as I can learn, the enemy are not moving in this direction, but continue to concentrate about Washington.”

    Robert E. Lee Sep 8 1862

    Lee displays his ignorance of the whereabouts of the Federal Army in a letter to Jefferson Davis

    From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak. Charleston: The History Press, 2011. 23

    OR 51:1

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.