“How does it look now?” Abraham Lincoln, September 12, 1862

President Abraham Lincoln

Voices from September 12, 1862

“How does it look now?”

Abraham Lincoln

September 12 1861

4AM telegram from President Lincoln to General McClellan

From OR 19 (2) page 271

 

“From all I can gather secesh is skeddadelling…I begin to think that he is making off to get out of the scrape by recrossing the river at Williamsport…He evidently don’t want to fight me for some reason or other.” George B. McClellan September 12 1861

McClellan to his wife describing the advance into Maryland

From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak.  Charleston:  The History Press, 2011.  Page  30

“My columns are pushing on rapidly to Frederick.  I feel perfectly confidant that the enemy has abandoned Frederick, moving in two directions, viz., on the Hagerstown and Harpers Ferry roads.”

George B. McClellan September 12 1861

McClellan in a telegraph to Washington describing Lees apparent dividing of his army.  From Lee’s Maverick General Daniel Harvey Hill by Hal Bridges.  Lincoln:  University of Nebraska Press, 1961. Page 94

 

“Wholly unused to such fatigues, and totally unacquainted with reducing their loads to the minimum by dispensing with useless appendages and trappings, the march told upon the men severely….Overburdened, worn and weary, man after man, yielding to the inevitable, had dropped by the wayside, or straggling, broken and dejected, was struggling to reach the goal of his apparently endless journey.  The sergeant and the color-guard fell in complete exhaustion, and colonel himself bore the standard to the bivouac.  Three men to a company, as the ‘strength present for duty,’ was a creditable showing when the final halt was made.”

Historian of he 118th Pennsylvania September 12 1861. From  “Who Would Not Be A Soldier?” by Scott D. Hartwig. The Antietam Campaign. Ed. Gary Gallagher  Chapel Hill:  The University of North Carolina Press,  1999. Page 148

“heard several remarks made as to what they were going to do in the morning.” Samuel A. Barras September 12 1861

Barras, regimental adjutant of the 126th NY describes the night on Elk Ridge.

From  “Who Would Not Be A Soldier?” by Scott D. Hartwig. The Antietam Campaign. Ed. Gary Gallagher  Chapel Hill:  The University of North Carolina Press,  1999. Page 150

“[We could hear the enemy in pretty large force, by their talk, as I judged.”

William H. Baird September 12 1861

Baird, regimental major of the 126th NY describes the night on Elk Ridge.

From  “Who Would Not Be A Soldier?” by Scott D. Hartwig. The Antietam Campaign. Ed. Gary Gallagher  Chapel Hill:  The University of North Carolina Press,  1999. Page 150

 

“a scared Governor ought not to be permitted to destroy the usefulness of an entire division of the army, on the eve of important operations….It is satisfactory in my mind that the rebels have no more intention of going to Harrisburg than they had of going to heaven.  It is only in the United States that atrocities like this are entertained.”

Joseph Hooker, September 12 1861.

Hooker protesting to McClellan the reassignment of Reynolds to command militia in Pennsylvania at the height of the Maryland Campaign.  From The Maryland Campaign of September 1862 Vol. 1 South Mountain. Edited by Tom Clemens. New York:  Savas Beatie, 2010. Page 204

 

Confederate Voices

 

“Before crossing the Potomac, I considered the advantages of entering Maryland east or west of the Blue Ridge.  In either case it was my intention to march upon this town [Hagerstown]”

Robert E. Lee, September 12 1862

Lee to Davis explaining his intentions to move on Hagerstown. From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999.

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