“General, I wish we could stand still and let the damned Yankees come to us!” James Longstreet, September 11 1862

Voices from September 11, 1862

 

Confederate

 

“General, I wish we could stand still and let the damned Yankees come to us!” James Longstreet, September 11 1862

Longstreet to Lee after he is ordered to proceed on to Hagerstown and to leave DH Hill at Boonsboro.  From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. page 184

 

“General Branch: The major-general commanding directs me to say that Major-General Hill, having been released from arrest, will assume command of his division, and you will turn over to him all instructions received relative to it.”

E.F. Paxton, September 11, 1862

Jackson’s assistant adjutant general notifies General Branch that A.P. Hill is restored to command of the Light Division. From OR 19 (2) page 604.

 

Union

 

“If we should be defeated, the consequences to the country would be disastrous in the extreme.”

George B. McClellan September 11 1862

McClellan to Halleck describing the significance of the next battle with Lee

From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak.  Charleston:  The History Press, 2011.  page 28

 

“All evidence that has been accumulated from various sources since we left Washington goes to prove most conclusively that almost the entire rebel army in Virginia, amounting to not less than 120,000 men, is in the vicinity of Frederick City.

George B. McClellan

September 11 1862

McClellan letter to Halleck from Rockville MD

From The Maryland Campaign of September 1862 Vol. 1 South Mountain. Edited by Tom Clemens. New York:  Savas Beatie, 2010.

page 183

 

“…if we defeat the army arrayed before us, the rebellion is crushed, for I do not believe they can organize another army.  But if we should be so unfortunate as to meet with defeat, our country is at their mercy.”

George B. McClellan September 11 1862

McClellan to Halleck describing the significance of the next battle with Lee

OR 19 (2) page 255

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