“We obviously have no friends in this town.” Thomas Jackson, September 10, 2011

Thomas J. Jackson

Voices from September 10, 1862

 

Confederate Voices

“We obviously have no friends in this town.”

Thomas Jackson

September 10 1862

While passing through Middletown Maryland, Jackson’s response to two young girls who waved American flags at Stonewall.

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. page 175

 

“Donning his coat and sword he mounted his horse and dashed to the front of his troops, and looking like a young eagle in search of his prey, he took command of his division to the delight of all his men” George Mills

September 10 1862

A North Carolina officer describing the suspension of A.P. Hill’s arrest

From General A. P. Hill – The Story of a Confederate Warrior by James I. Robertson.  New York:  Random House, 1987. page 135

 

“As soon as we came in sight of the Potomac the boys gave one of the loudest and most protracted & glorious shouts you ever heard.  We crossed by moonlight and the whole scene was one of the most inspiring I have ever witnessed.” William G. Deloney September 10 1862

Deloney of Cobbs Legion describing entry into Maryland

From Cavalryman of the Lost Cause by Jeffry D. Wert.  New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. page 141

 

“joys mine.  My command is okay.”

J.E.B. Stuart September 10 1862

J.E.B  Stuart to wife Flora on the good news that that Beverly Robertson had been transferred to North Carolina

From Cavalryman of the Lost Cause by Jeffry D. Wert.  New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. page 141

 

“We obviously have no friends in this town.”

Thomas Jackson

September 10 1862

While passing through Middletown MD, Jackson’s response to two young girls who waved American flags at Stonewall.

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. page 175

 

Suffice it that General Lee seems well to understand what he is about.  Yankeedom seems a good deal stirred up.” William Nelson Pendleton

September 10 1862

William Pendleton in a letter

From “We Don’t Know What on Earth to Do with Him-William Nelson Pendleton.”by Peter S. Carmichael. The Antietam Campaign. Ed. Gary Gallagher. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1999. page 264

Union Voices

 

“bear comparison with the ruin and disasters which would follow a signal defeat of this army. Everything seems to indicate that [the Confederates] intend to hazard all upon the coming battle.  You may be sure that I will follow them as closely as I can, and fight them whenever I can find them.”

George B. McClellan

September 10 1862

McClellan in a letter to Gov Curtin of Pennsylvania

From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak.  Charleston:  The History Press, 2011.  page 29

 

“an incompetent squirt”

Robert Ingersoll

September 10 1862

Col Ingersoll of the 11th Illinois Cavalry describes John Pope.

From General John Pope A Life for the Nation by Peter Cozzens.  Urbana:  University of Illinois Press, 2000. page 73

 

“their friends were anxious to get rid of them and of the penetrating ammoniacal smell they brought with them.”

Lewis H. Steiner September 10 1862

Steiner watches the reaction of the citizens as the Confederate Army left Frederick

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Jospeh L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999. page 171

 

“You can have no possible idea of the desolation of Va. The fences are gone, trees cut down, grass eat up for forage, and the country cut up by military roads.” Robert Kellog September 10 1862

Describing the countryside of Virginia.  From  “All Who Went into That Battle Were Heroes-Remembering the 16th Connecticut Volunteers at Antietam.” by Lesley J. Gordon. The Antietam Campaign. Ed. Gary Gallagher  Chapel Hill:  The University of North Carolina Press,  1999. page 173

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: