“As far as I can learn, the enemy are not moving in this direction, but continue to concentrate about Washington.” Robert E. Lee, September 8, 1862

General Robert E. Lee

Voices from September 8, 1862

 

Confederate Voices

 

“As far as I can learn, the enemy are not moving in this direction, but continue to concentrate about Washington.”

Robert E. Lee

September 8 1862

Lee displays his ignorance of the whereabouts of the Federal Army in a letter to Jefferson Davis

From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak.  Charleston:  The History Press, 2011.

page 23

 

“I never saw such pretty country or an old one in my life,…splendid crops have been raised in this part of Maryland and everything good to eat.”

H. Watters Berryman

September 8 1862

Pvt Watters Berryman of Co I 1st Texas describes Maryland

From “First Texas in the Cornfield.” by George E. Otott.  The Maryland Campaign of 1862 Civil War Regiments:  A Journal of the American Civil War. Vol 5, No 3. Campbell CA:  Savas Publishing Company, 1998.

page 77

 

“…your citizens have been arrested and imprisoned upon no charge and contrary to all forms of law.  The faithful and manly protest against this outrage made by the venerable and illustrious Marylander, to whom in better days no citizen appealed for right in vain, was treated with scorn and contempt; the government of your chief city has been usurped by armed strangers; your legislature has been dissolved by the unlawful arrest of its members; freedom of the press and of speech has been suppressed; words have been declared offenses by an arbitrary decree of the Federal Executive, and citizens ordered to be tried by a military commission for what they may dare to speak…”

Robert E. Lee

September 8 1862

Excerpt from Lee’s Proclamation to Marylanders

From The Maryland Campaign of September 1862 Vol. 1 South Mountain. Edited by Tom Clemens. New York:  Savas Beatie, 2010.

page 106

 

“The proposal of peace would enable the people of the United States to determine at their coming elections whether they will support those who favor a prolongation of the war, or those who wish to bring it to a termination, which can but be productive of good to both parties without affecting the honor of either.”

Robert E. Lee

September 8 1862

Lee to Davis that discusses political matters.  From Frederick MD

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by JoSeptemberh L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999.

page 127

 

Union Voices

 

 

“do not for a moment believe that either President, Congress, myself or any person connected with this government, will in any case entertain any proposition or suggestion or arrangement or accommodation or adjustment from within or without upon the basis of a surrender of the Federal Union.  We shall prosecute this war to its end.”

William Seward

September 8 1862

Seward conversation with French ambassador Mercier from Seward to Dayton

From Blue and Gray Diplomacy by Howard Jones. Chapel Hill:  The University of North Carolina Press, 2010.

page 213

 

“Brig. Gen. J.K.F. Mansfield, U.S. Volunteers, is relieved from duty in the Army of Virginia and will report in person to Major General McClellan.”

E.D. Townsend

September 8 1862

Special order 229 assigning Mansfield to the Army of the Potomac

OR 19 (2)

page 214

 

“Genl. S. [Sumner], although very strict as regards discharge of duty, is a most kindly disposed man.”

Paul J. Revere

September 8 1862

Col. Paul J. Revere describes Sumner to his wife.

From Unfurl Those Colors! McClellan, Sumner, & The Second Army Corps in the Antietam Campaign by Marion Armstrong. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2008.

page 87

 

“I did intimate something of the kind, that I feared increased responsibility just now.”

Oliver O. Howard

September 8 1862

Howard evidently professing to his wife in the late summer of 1862 that he preferred staying at brigade command

From Unfurl Those Colors! McClellan, Sumner, & The Second Army Corps in the Antietam Campaign by Marion Armstrong. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2008.

page 80

 

“quite disappointed after all when I found it [the division] given away and I was not asked to take it.”

Oliver O. Howard

September 8 1862

Howard disappointed that he did not receive the Second Corps division that went to General French

From Unfurl Those Colors! McClellan, Sumner, & The Second Army Corps in the Antietam Campaign by Marion Armstrong. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2008.

page 80

 

“all the hens within a mile have been bagged by our men.  One man in the vicinity had forty hens, and the boys took them all besides a pig.”

Albert A. Pope

September 8 1862

Pope of the 35th MA describes foraging in his diary

From  “Who Would Not Be A Soldier?” by Scott D. Hartwig. The Antietam Campaign. Ed. Gary Gallagher  Chapel Hill:  The University of North Carolina Press,  1999.

page 149

 

 

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