“We are well & the entire army is now united, cheerful & confidant. You need not fear the result for I believe that God will give us the victory.” George B. McClellan September 7 1862

George B. McClellan

Voices from September 7, 1862

 

Union Voices

“We are well & the entire army is now united, cheerful & confidant. You need not fear the result for I believe that God will give us the victory.”

George B. McClellan

September 7 1862

McClellan to his wife describing the advance into Maryland

From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak.  Charleston:  The History Press, 2011.

page 28

 

“I shall have nearly 100,000 men, old & new, & hope with God’s blessing to gain a decisive victory [and] I think we shall win for the men are now in good spirits-confidant in the General & all united in sentiment.”

George B. McClellan

September 7 1862

McClellan on September 7 1862 in a letter to his wife, describing his chances of defeating the Confederate Army in Maryland

From Burnside’s Bridge The Climactic Struggle of the 2nd and 20th Georgia at Antietam Creek by Phillip T. Tucker. Mechanicsburg:  Stackpole, 2000.

page 5

“Truthfulness is not, as you know, an element in French diplomacy to manners.  No man but a Frenchman would ever have thought of [Charles} Talleyrand’s famous bon mot, that the object of language was to conceal thought.”

William L. Dayton

September 7 1862

Dayton, US ambassador to France describing the French

From Blue and Gray Diplomacy by Howard Jones. Chapel Hill:  The University of North Carolina Press, 2010.

page 285

 

“Notwithstanding individual expressions of kindness that had been given, and the general sympathy in the success of the Confederate States,, situated as Maryland is, I do not anticipate any general rising of the people in our behalf.”

Robert E. Lee

September 7 1862

Lee to Davis describing the attitude of the Marylanders

From Burnside’s Bridge The Climactic Struggle of the 2nd and 20th Georgia at Antietam Creek by Phillip T. Tucker. Mechanicsburg:  Stackpole, 2000.

page 4

 

“One of the greatest evils…is the habit of straggling from the ranks.  It has become a habit difficult to correct.  With some, the sick and feeble, it results from necessity, but with the greater number from design.  These latter do not wish to be with their regiments, not to share in their hardships and glories.  They are the cowards of the army [who] desert their comrades in times of danger.”

Robert E. Lee

September 7 1862

Lee discussing the evils of straggleing in a letter to Davis

From The Battle of South Mountain by John David Hoptak.  Charleston:  The History Press, 2011.

page 20

 

“That under these circumstances, we are driven to protect our own country by transferring the seat of war to that of an enemy, who pursues us with a relentless and, apparently aimless hostility;”

Jefferson Davis

September 7 1862

Part of a proclamation drafted by President Davis for Lee to use in Maryland

OR 19 (2)

page 598

 

 

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