“The enemy are now shelling the aqueduct over Monocacy river, and I judge are attempting to cross, from the reports of musketry heard.”

Confederates Crossing the Potomac River

Voices from September 4, 1862

 

Union Voices

 

“A large wagon train-judge 50-75 wagons, moving out from Leesburg, easterly, in direction of Edwards Ferry.  Continuous clouds of dust seen on roads leading in & out of Leesburg.  A large wagon park 4 to 6 miles southeast of Leesburg, near turnpike.  The enemy are now shelling the aqueduct over Monocacy river, and I judge are attempting to cross, from the reports of musketry heard.”

Brinkerhoff N. Miner

Lt Miner of the Signal Corps makes this report from the Sugar Loaf signal station to a colleague in Poolesville

From The Secret War for the Union by Edwin C. Fishel. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1996.

page 211

 

“I am in despair of our seeing a termination of the war until some change is made.  On our part it has been a war of politicians; on theirs [the Confederacy] it has been one conducted by a despot and carried out by able generals.  I look upon a division as certain; the only question is where the line is to run.  No one would have dared to think of this a few weeks since, but it is in the mouths of many now.”

John Sedgwick

Sedwick on the possibility of winning the war

From Mr. Lincoln’s Army by Bruce Catton.  New York: Anchor Books 1990.

page 208

 

“Our troops know of none other they can trust”

Alexander S. Webb

Letter to Webb’s father describing the return of George McClellan to command

From George B McClellan – The Young Napoleon by Stephen Sears.  New York:  Ticknor & Fields, 1988.

page 265

 

“McClellan’s reappointment gives great satisfaction to the soldiers.  Whether right or wrong they believe in him”

William T. Lusk

Lusk, one of Burnside’s officers in a letter to his father

From George B McClellan – The Young Napoleon by Stephen Sears.  New York:  Ticknor & Fields, 1988.

page 265

 

 

Confederate Voices

 

“This army is about entering Maryland with a view of affording the people of that State an opportunity of liberating themselves.”

Robert E. Lee

Lee to Davis announcing his desire to move into Maryland

From Burnside’s Bridge The Climactic Struggle of the 2nd and 20th Georgia at Antietam Creek by Phillip T. Tucker. Mechanicsburg:  Stackpole, 2000.

page 4

 

“stragglers are usually those who desert their comrades in peril…unworthy members of an army which has immortalized itself.”

Robert E. Lee

General Order 102

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999.

page 74

 

“…I am more fully persuaded of the benefits which will result from an expedition into Maryland, and I shall proceed to make the movement at once, unless you should signify your disapprobation.”

Robert E. Lee

Lee to Davis describing the need to move into Maryland in his second letter of Sep 4

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999.

page 75

 

“to detain the enemy upon the northern frontier until the approach of winter.”

Robert E. Lee

Lee to Davis describing the need to move into Maryland in his second letter of Sep 4

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999.

page 76

 

“Should the results of the expedition justify it, I propose to enter Pennsylvania, unless you should deem it unadvisable upon political or other grounds.”

Robert E. Lee

Lee to Davis describing the need to move into Maryland in his second letter of Sep 4

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999.

page 77

 

“Our men do not grumble.  They only straggle.”

Lafayette McLaws

McLaws to Lee shortly after his men join the Army of Northern Virginia

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999.

page 44

 

“In we bulged, our bands playing, and the boys yelling, as jolly as any who had gone before or any who came after us.”

John Stevens

Pvt John Stevens of the 5th Texas recounts the crossing of the Potomac on Sep 4, 1862

From “First Texas in the Cornfield.” by George E. Otott.  The Maryland Campaign of 1862 Civil War Regiments:  A Journal of the American Civil War. Vol 5, No 3. Campbell CA:  Savas Publishing Company, 1998.

page 75

 

“Never did I behold so many naked legs in my life.”

Draughton Stith Haynes

A member of the 49th Georgia describing the crossing of the Potomac

From Taken at the Flood Robert E. Lee & Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 by Joseph L. Harsh.  Kent:  The Kent State University Press, 1999.

page 87

 

Hill: “If you take command of my troops in my presence, take my sword also.”  Jackson:  ”  Put up your sword and consider yourself in arrest.”

A.P. Hill

Arrest of AP Hill by Stonewall Jackson as witnessed by COL William Palmer and Jed Hotchkiss

From General A. P. Hill – The Story of a Confederate Warrior by James I. Robertson.  New York:  Random House, 1987.

page 131

 

“There are but few commanders who properly appreciate the value of celerity.”

Thomas Jackson

Jackson to Maxcy Gregg when Gregg halted his men.  Prelude to arrest of A.P. Hill  From Benson, Berry Benson.

From Stonewall Jackson The Man, The Soldier, The Legend by James I. Robertson.  New York:  Macmillan Publishing Co, 1997.

page 585

 

“There’s only one language that will make mules understand on a hot day that they must get out of the water!”

John A. Harman

Jackson’s quartermaster Harman explaining his profanity in exhorting the mules from the Potomac River

From Stonewall Jackson The Man, The Soldier, The Legend by James I. Robertson.  New York:  Macmillan Publishing Co, 1997.

page 587

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: