Pennsylvania Militia – John Reynolds

John Reynolds

John Reynolds Quotes (23 quotes)

Last Updated September 23, 2011

With quotations by Reynolds first followed by others

During the Maryland Campaign, Reynolds, much to his disgust, was detached from his command of the Pennsylvania Reserve Division in the First Corps and given command of Pennsylvania Emergency Militia assembling just north of Hagerstown Maryland. 

Quotes made by John Reynolds:

 

“I do not think much can be expected of them – not very much.”

John Reynolds. September 19 1862. Reynolds assessment of the Pennsylvania militia he now commands. From Unfurl Those Colors! McClellan, Sumner, & The Second Army Corps in the Antietam Campaign by Marion Armstrong. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2008. page 306.

Quotes made about John Reynolds by others:

 

“perhaps few knew him intimately, for he was a strangely reticent man…[But] his opponents recognized his ability and his soldiers knew that he held in reserve a latent force of clear and cool headedness that could always be relied upon.  They trusted him implicitly.”

A Michigan veteran describes Reynolds. From “John Reynolds and the Iron Brigade.”by Lance J. Herdegen. Giants in Their Tall Black Hats – Essays on the Iron Brigade. Ed. Alan T. Nolan and Sharon Eggleston VipondBloomington:  Indiana University Press, 1998.  page 106

“very fortunate that our general had, not only common sense, but sufficient humanity in his heart to use it.”

A veteran recalls Reynolds. From “John Reynolds and the Iron Brigade.”by Lance J. Herdegen. Giants in Their Tall Black Hats – Essays on the Iron Brigade. Ed. Alan T. Nolan and Sharon Eggleston VipondBloomington:  Indiana University Press, 1998.  page 106

 

“dark, silent, alert man”

A Wisconsin man, an Iron Brigade soldier describes Reynolds

From “John Reynolds and the Iron Brigade.”by Lance J. Herdegen. Giants in Their Tall Black Hats – Essays on the Iron Brigade. Ed. Alan T. Nolan and Sharon Eggleston VipondBloomington:  Indiana University Press, 1998.  page 106

“For my part, I think we have got the best man of the two, much as I think of Reynolds.  He will do better at carrying out plans than at devising them, I think.” Charles S. Wainright June 30 1862

Wainwright comparing Meade and Reynolds and being pleased with Meade over Reynolds selection to command the Army of the Potomac. From A Diary of Battle The Personal Journals of Colonel Charles S. Wainright 1861-1865 by Charles S. Wainwright edited by Allan Nevins. New York:  De Capo Press, 1998. page 218

“General Reynolds is not at all of the fancy order, so we shall probably have nothing better than our tents to live in all winter;”

Charles S. Wainright February 8 1862. Wainwright on Reynolds simplicity

From A Diary of Battle The Personal Journals of Colonel Charles S. Wainright 1861-1865 by Charles S. Wainwright edited by Allan Nevins. New York:  De Capo Press, 1998. page 163

“General Reynolds is very different from Hooker, in that he never expresses an opinion about other officers.  I can get nothing from him, but now that my reports are all in shall ride around and find out what I can….”

Charles S. Wainright December 21 1862.  Wainwright on Reynolds tendency towards reticence.  From A Diary of Battle The Personal Journals of Colonel Charles S. Wainright 1861-1865 by Charles S. Wainwright edited by Allan Nevins. New York:  De Capo Press, 1998. page 149.

“General Reynolds obey orders literally himself, and expects all under him to do the same.” Charles S. Wainright describes Reynolds

From “We Shall Make Richmond Howl The Army of the Potomac on the Eve of Chancellorsville.” by John Hennessy. Chancellorsville The Battle and Its Aftermath. Ed. Garry Gallagher. Chapel Hill:University of North Carolina Press, 1999. page 20.

“How the orders cutting down transportation and so forth have been carried out in other corps I do not know, but General Reynolds obeys orders literally himself, and expects all under him to do the same.” Charles S. Wainright. April 15 1862. Wainwright offers another picture of General Reynolds. From A Diary of Battle The Personal Journals of Colonel Charles S. Wainright 1861-1865 by Charles S. Wainwright edited by Allan Nevins. New York:  De Capo Press, 1998. page 177.

 

“I think I shall like Reynolds quite as much, and have a good deal more respect for him….” Charles S. Wainright,  November 12 1862.  Wainwright on word that Hooker is going to Fifth Corps and Reynolds stays with First Corps

From A Diary of Battle The Personal Journals of Colonel Charles S. Wainright 1861-1865 by Charles S. Wainwright edited by Allan Nevins. New York:  De Capo Press, 1998. page 124.

“None of General Reynolds’s staff were injured, though even the surgeon and commissary were always with him, and he exposed himself in the most reckless manner.” Charles S. Wainright December 16 1862.  Wainwright on the bravery of Reynolds at Fredericksburg.  From A Diary of Battle The Personal Journals of Colonel Charles S. Wainright 1861-1865 by Charles S. Wainwright edited by Allan Nevins. New York:  De Capo Press, 1998. page 126.

 

“Reynolds certainly is indefatigable, he looks after the whole corps on the march more closely than Hooker did after his division; he certainly will never be caught napping. So far, I am exceedingly pleased with him.” Charles S. Wainright. November 1 1862.  Wainwright on the assumption of Reynolds to First Corps command.  From A Diary of Battle The Personal Journals of Colonel Charles S. Wainright 1861-1865 by Charles S. Wainwright edited by Allan Nevins. New York:  De Capo Press, 1998. page 116.

 

“Reynolds showed me a trait of character which is to a certain extent commendable, but not always agreeable to others….Well enough to keep an eye on them until you know they are competent; but if you are interfering in every little matter they will never have confidence in themselves….” Charles S. Wainright. June 12 1863.  Wainwright on Reynolds

From A Diary of Battle The Personal Journals of Colonel Charles S. Wainright 1861-1865 by Charles S. Wainwright edited by Allan Nevins. New York:  De Capo Press, 1998. page 212

“The General has been quite nervous during the day, and has sworn pretty hard when things did not go to suit him.” Charles S. Wainright. April 29 1862

Wainwright on John Reynolds as the Chancellorsville campaign opens. From A Diary of Battle The Personal Journals of Colonel Charles S. Wainright 1861-1865 by Charles S. Wainwright edited by Allan Nevins. New York:  De Capo Press, 1998. page 183.

“Though Doubleday is supposed to be in command of the corps, all our orders come from Reynolds direct, and he looks as closely as ever after everything himself….” Charles S. Wainright June 30 1862. Wainwright describing Reynolds style of command at the start of the Gettysburg campaign

From A Diary of Battle The Personal Journals of Colonel Charles S. Wainright 1861-1865 by Charles S. Wainwright edited by Allan Nevins. New York:  De Capo Press, 1998. page 219.

“tall, dark, slender…a wild rolling eye. Very nervous to all appearance Edward Adams. July 3 1863.  Adams in a letter to his father

From “John Reynolds and the Iron Brigade.”by Lance J. Herdegen. Giants in Their Tall Black Hats – Essays on the Iron Brigade. Ed. Alan T. Nolan and Sharon Eggleston VipondBloomington:  Indiana University Press, 1998.  page 104.

“His death at this time affected us very much, for he was one of the soldier generals of the army, a man whose soul was in his country’s work, which he did with a soldier’s high honor and fidelity.” Frank A. Haskell. July 1 1863

Haskell, an aide to General Gibbon upon learning of Reynolds death.  From George Gordon Meade and the War in the East by Ethan S. Rause.  Abilene:  McWhiney Founation Press, 2003. page 73.

“was one of the soldier Generals of the army, a man whose soul was in his country’s work, which he did with a soldier’s high honor and fidelity. Mounted upon a superb black horse, with his head thrown back and his great black eyes flashing fire, he was every where upon the field, seeing all things and giving commands in person.” Frank A. Haskell recalls Reynolds at the Battle of Fredericksburg.  From “John Reynolds and the Iron Brigade.”by Lance J. Herdegen. Giants in Their Tall Black Hats – Essays on the Iron Brigade. Ed. Alan T. Nolan and Sharon Eggleston VipondBloomington:  Indiana University Press, 1998.  page 102.

 

“one of the soldier generals of the army, a man whose soul was in his country’s work.” Frank Haskell describes Reynolds. From “We Shall Make Richmond Howl The Army of the Potomac on the Eve of Chancellorsville.” by John Hennessy. Chancellorsville The Battle and Its Aftermath. Ed. Garry Gallagher. Chapel Hill:University of North Carolina Press, 1999. page 20.

 

“superb-looking man, dark-complexioned, wearing full black whiskers…sat his horse like a centaur, tall, straight, and graceful, the ideal soldier.”

Colonel Fred Hitchcock describes Reynolds.  From “John Reynolds and the Iron Brigade.”by Lance J. Herdegen. Giants in Their Tall Black Hats – Essays on the Iron Brigade. Ed. Alan T. Nolan and Sharon Eggleston VipondBloomington:  Indiana University Press, 1998.  page 106.

 

“remarkably brave and intelligent, an honest true gentleman.”

George B. McClellan describes John Reynolds

From “John Reynolds and the Iron Brigade.”by Lance J. Herdegen. Giants in Their Tall Black Hats – Essays on the Iron Brigade. Ed. Alan T. Nolan and Sharon Eggleston VipondBloomington:  Indiana University Press, 1998.  page 101.

“I have never had an officer under me acquit himself so handsomely.”

Joseph Hooker describing Reynolds. From “We Shall Make Richmond Howl The Army of the Potomac on the Eve of Chancellorsville.” by John Hennessy. Chancellorsville The Battle and Its Aftermath. Ed. Garry Gallagher. Chapel Hill:University of North Carolina Press, 1999. page 20.

5 Responses

  1. […] Pennsylvania Militia – John Reynolds […]

  2. You have compiled an impressive collections of quotations from so many different leaders. I visit your site as much as possible. Keep up the great work!

    • Thanks Steve. You really see what these men and women are like by hearing first hand, their own words or those of their contemporaries, without layers of historical interpretation.

  3. Yes sir, I am in total agreement. I am actually writing my senior thesis essay about the memory of General John Reynolds from Gettysburg to present. I have used much of the same sources as you have done here. I have found the “John Reynolds and the Iron Brigade particularly helpful. Thanks for creating such a wonderful site.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: