Fifth Corps – Fitz-John Porter

Fitz-John Porter

Fitz-John Porter Quotes

Last Updated  December 6, 2010

With quotations about Porter first followed by others in alphabetical order of the person making the quote

“Yet conceding his eminent ability as a soldier, it is questionable under the circumstances if he should have been restored to command on the eve of an important campaign and if he gave strength to McClellan and the cause of the Union.”

Carmen, Ezra

Pierro, Joseph, ed. The Maryland Campaign of 1862. New York: Routledge, 2008 pg 76

“there would be no aggressive action that night or next day should McClellan listen to the advice of Fitz John Porter.”

Hooker, Joseph

Hooker to Ezra Carmen regarding any plans to attack at Antietam on the evening of Sep 15 or morning of Sep 16

Pierro, Joseph, ed. The Maryland Campaign of 1862. New York: Routledge, 2008 pg 180

“I am constantly told that you consult and communicate with nobody but General Fitz John Porter, and perhaps General Franklin.  I do not say these complaints are true or just; but at all events it is proper you should know of their existence.”

Lincoln, Abraham

May 9 1862

Lincoln a letter to McClellan

Pierro, Joseph, ed. The Maryland Campaign of 1862. New York: Routledge, 2008 pg 76

“Porter sent us a peccary.”

McClellan, George B.

Jan 18 1847

Diary entry.  McClellan’s old friend send him a peccary for dinner

McClellan, George B. The Mexican War Diary and Correspondence of George B. McClellan edited by Thomas W. Cutrer (Baton Rouge:  Louisiana State University Press, 2009 pg 63

“Take him for all in all, he was probably the best general officer I had under me.  He had excellent ability, sound judgement, and all the instincts of a soldier.  He was perfectly familiar with all the details of his duty, an excellent organizer and administrative officer, and one of the most conscientious and laborious men I ever knew.  I never found it necessary to do more than give him general instructions, for it was certain that all details would be cared for and nothing neglected.  I always knew that an order given to him would be fully carried out, were it morally and physically possible.  He was one of the coolest and most imperturbable men in danger whom I ever knew, like all his race.”

McClellan, George B.

McClellan in his memoirs describing Porter

Clemens, Thomas G, ed. The Maryland Campaign of September 1862 Vol. 1 South Mountain, (New York:  Savas Beatie, 2010) pg 155

McClellan, George B. McClellan’s Own Story. (New York: Charles L. Webster and Co., 1887) pg 139

“Born a patriot; ambitious, but unselfish; self-respecting and self-denying; thoroughly equippped and void of ostentation; imperturbable and unflinching; self reliant but never egotistic; prudent without trace of fear; reserved, yet sympathetic; quiet, but quick to see, decide and act; cautious and careful to avoid offense, if possible, yet without strange oaths or foreign aid conveying with an order given the conviction that obedience must follow, his influence was ever present and controllin.g”

Powell, William H.

A Fifth Corps biographer

Clemens, Thomas G, ed. The Maryland Campaign of September 1862 Vol. 1 South Mountain, (New York:  Savas Beatie, 2010) pg 156

Powell, William H. The Fifth Army Corps (New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1896) pg 6

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