Diplomacy

Charles F. Adams U.S. Minister to Great Britain

Diplomacy

Quotes relating to the diplomatic front.  They arranged in order of the person making the quote.  As of December 21, 2011.

 

“done a good deal to restore our drooping credit here…less and less appears to be thought of mediation and intervention.”

Charles F. Adams Jr., U.S. Minister Adams in a letter to the State Department on the effects of the Battle of Antietam

From Counter-Thrust From the Peninsula to the Antietam by Benjamin Franklin Cooling. Lincoln: University of Nebraska 2007.

 

“The great body of the aristocracy and the commercial classes, are anxious to see the United States go to pieces, the middle and lower class sympathize with us.  [They] see in the convulsion in America an era in the history of the world, out of which must come in the end a general recognition of the right of mankind to the produce of the labor and the pursuit of happiness.” Charles F. Adams Jr. Dec 25 1862

Adams in a letter to Seward describing the sentiments of the British people

From Blue and Gray Diplomacy by Howard Jones. Chapel Hill:  The University of North Carolina Press, 2010.

 

“I agree with you that the time is come for offering mediation to the United States government, with a view to the recognition of the independence of the Confederates.” John Russell Sep 17 1862

British Foreign Secretary John Russell in a letter to Prime Minister Lord Palmerston

From Our Boys Did Nobly Schuylkill County Pennsylvania, Soldiers at the Battles of South Mountain and Antietam by John David Hoptak.  John David Hoptak, 2009.

 

“…it is evident that a great conflict is taking place north-west of Washington, and its issue must have a great effect on the state of affairs.  If the Federals sustain a great defeat, they may be at once ready for mediation, and the iron should be struck while it is hot.  If, on the other hand, they should have the best of it, we may wait awhile and see what may follow…” Viscount Palmerston Sep 23 1862

Prime Minister Viscount Palmerston to British Secretary of state for foreign affairs John Russell September 23, 1862

From The Maryland Campaign of 1862 edited by Joseph Pierro. New York: Routledge, 2008

 

“Full of difficulty, and can only be cleared up by some more decided events between the contending armies.”

Viscount Palmerston in a letter to Russel on the effect of the Battle of Antietam

From Counter-Thrust From the Peninsula to the Antietam by Benjamin Franklin Cooling. Lincoln: University of Nebraska 2007.

 

“have rather set up the North again.”

Viscount Palmerston in a letter to Russel on the effect of the Battle of Antietam

From Counter-Thrust From the Peninsula to the Antietam by Benjamin Franklin Cooling. Lincoln: University of Nebraska 2007.

 

“We must continue to be lookers-on till the war shall have taken a more decided turn.”

Viscount Palmerston Oct 22 1862 Palmerston in a letter to Russel on the effect of the Battle of Antietam

From Counter-Thrust From the Peninsula to the Antietam by Benjamin Franklin Cooling. Lincoln: University of Nebraska 2007.

 

“do not for a moment believe that either President, Congress, myself or any person connected with this government, will in any case entertain any proposition or suggestion or arrangement or accommodation or adjustment from within or without upon the basis of a surrender of the Federal Union.  We shall prosecute this war to its end.” William Seward Sep 8 1862

Seward conversation with French ambassador Mercier from Seward to Dayton

From Blue and Gray Diplomacy by Howard Jones. Chapel Hill:  The University of North Carolina Press, 2010.

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