Cavalry Division – James Ewell Brown Stuart

James Ewell Brown Stuart

JEB Stuart Quotes

Last Updated January 20, 2010

With quotations by Stuart first followed by others in alphabetical order of the person making the quote

“I realize that if we oppose force to force we cannot win, for their resources are greater than ours.  We must make up in quality what we lack in numbers.  We must substitute esprit for numbers.  Therefore, I strive to inculcate in my men the spirit of the chase.”

Stuart, J.E.B.

Thomason, Jeb Stuart, p. 9

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 54

“Be consoled…by the reflection that your husband & brothers will atone for the father’s conduct”

Stuart, J.E.B.

JEBS- Flora Stuart.  Concerning her father’s decision to remain with the Union

Hsieh, Wayne Wei-siang.  West Pointers and the Civil War The Old Army in War and Peace. Chapel Hill:  The University of North Carolina Press, 2009 pg 106

“Well Munford, you have had a rough time.  You can take your choice either remain here & hold the Gap or go with me to Harper’s Ferry as you please.  You or Hampton must go with me.”

Stuart, J.E.B.

Sep 14 1862

Stuart to Munford on who should stay and hold Crampton’s Gap.  Munford-Ellis Papers History of the 2nd Virginia Cav

Reese, Timothy J.  Sealed With Their Lives The Battle for Crampton’s Gap.  Baltimore:  Butternut and Blue.  1998 pg 40

“I would rather be a private in Virginia’s army than a general in any army that was going to coerce her.”

Stuart, J.E.B.

unk

“Contrary to the expectations of all, I have been so fortunate as not to have a single fight since I have been going to school…Not from cowardice either (for I know you will immediately suspect that as being the reason)”

Stuart, J.E.B.

Young Stuart at age 13 in a letter to a cousin.  Thomas Bold Dragoon, p 10

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 7

“the evidence of a Savior’s pardoning love…and prayed God to guide me in the right way and teach me to walk as a Christian should.”

Stuart, J.E.B.

Jan 25 1851

JBS-Milt, Stuart Papers, VHS

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 11

“I would not have been worthy of the name Stuart had I arrived here safely and without losing or forgetting something.”

Stuart, J.E.B.

in a letter written from Washington DC enroute to West Point.  Mitchell, Adele H., ed The Letters of Major General James E. B. Stuart. N.p.:Stuart-Mosby Historical Society, 1990

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 12

“it is a great place in every respect-great for the facilities for education-as studying human nature, learning the ways of the world and for straightening the form.”

Stuart, J.E.B.

Stuart in a letter to a cousin describing West Point.  Mitchell, Adele H., ed The Letters of Major General James E. B. Stuart. N.p.:Stuart-Mosby Historical Society, 1990

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 14

“I sometimes think that the taste for each other’s society particularly West Pointers is unequalled by the strangest attachment and what is more remarkable, it becomes more and more intense as time continues.”

Stuart, J.E.B.

Hairston, ed., “J.E.B Stuart’s letters,” NCHR v 51 no 3, p.300

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 16

“that if he were to drink any strong liquors at all, he is sure he should be too fond of it, and therefore prefers total abstinence.”

Stuart, J.E.B.

to an acquaintance Stuart made this observation about his abstinence from alcohol.  Ross, Cities and Camps, p 171

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 31

“Ours is a glorious country.  I love it but like Mr. [John C.] Calhoun, while I love the Union I love Virginia more and if one attachment ever becomes incompatible with the other I scruple not to say ‘Virginia shall command my poor services.'”

Stuart, J.E.B.

Summer 1859

An address by Stuart to fellow members of the Hermesian Society at Emory and Henry College in the summer of 1859.  “Speech to Hermesian Society [1859], Stuart Papers, VHS

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 36

“For my part, I have no hesitancy from the first that, right or wrong, alone or otherwise, I go with Virginia.”

Stuart, J.E.B.

Jan 18 1861

In a letter to a fellow officer stationed at West Point.  JEBS-My dear brother, Jan 18 1861 Stuart Papers VHS

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 43

“I have a reputation of being fond of saying, ‘no’ but I have had but one rule of action from the first and that was duty.”

Stuart, J.E.B.

JEBS- Flora Stuart.  Thomason, Jeb Stuart, p. 11

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 62

“You need not be surprised to see your hubbie a Brigadier.  I have been in one real battle now & feel sure that I can command better than many I saw.”

Stuart, J.E.B.

July 31 1861

in a letter to his wife Flora about the time he is promoted to brigadier general

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 65

“I would like to be with you Dearest this dreary winter’s night, Do you think of your old stove these cold nights.”

Stuart, J.E.B.

Dec 1861

in a letter to his wife Flora

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 75

“joys mine.  My command is okay.”

Stuart, J.E.B.

Sep 10 1862

JEBS to Flora on word that Beverly Robertson had been transferred to NC

Wert,, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 141

“You’ve got it kid! Give it to them!”

Stuart, J.E.B.

May 3 1863

Stuart to a young artillery officer who found the range at the battle of Chancellorsville

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 229

“You know, I make duty paramount to everything.”

Stuart, J.E.B.

May 26, 1863

in a letter to his wife Flora

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 237

“A military man without aspirations is like a vessel without sail-a compass without the needle.”

Stuart, J.E.B.

Feb 10 1864

Stuart in a letter to Alexander Boteler urging him to support his promotion to Lieutenant General

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 329

“I never expect to come out of this war alive.”

Stuart, J.E.B.

To Esten Cooke

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 337

“No Freed, I do not love bullets any better than you do; I go where they are because it is my duty, and I do not expect to survive the war.

Stuart, J.E.B.

May 11 1864

Stuart in a response to his longtime bugler Private George Freed who remarked “General, I believe you love bullets.”

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 350

“Go ahead Fitz, old fellow.  I know you will do what is right.”

Stuart, J.E.B.

May 11 1864

Stuart’s words to Fitz Lee after being wounded and handing over command. At Yellow Tavern

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 358

“Go back! go Back! And do your duty as I have done mine, and our country will be safe, Go Back! Go Back! I had rather die than be whipped.”

Stuart, J.E.B.

May 11 1864

Stuart after being wounded attempting to rally the troops at Yellow Tavern

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 358

“I am going fast now.  I am resigned.  God’s will be done.”

Stuart, J.E.B.

May 12 1864

Last words

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 361

“but I wish an assurance on your part in the other event your surviving me, that you will make the land for which I have given my life your home, and keep my offspring on southern soil.”

Stuart, J.E.B.

March 19 1863

Stuart in a reply to a letter from Flora concerning his wishes in the event of death

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 367

“I can’t imagine anyone more likely to suffer in his own feelings than Gen Jeb from the withdrawal of that popular applause which he is so fond of sunning himself in.”

a cavalryman

Stuart’s feelings after Brandy Station

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 252

“the only man he ever saw that [a] beard improved.”

A fellow officer

Thomas Bold Dragoon, pp 18,19

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 15

“The only thing I can now call to mind of him was his having a favorite horse which would follow him about like a dog, whenever he dismounted.  Stuart was whiskered to the eyes like a Cossack, and had a great thick head of hair besides to complete the resemblance.”

A fellow officer

a fellow officer at Ft Riley.  Drake, Samuel Adams.  “The Old Army in Kansas”  MOLLUS, Massachusetts, v1,p149

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 35

“worth a dozen ordinary men…always prolific of expedients for working his way out of difficult or embarrassing situations.”

a man who served with Stuart in Kansas

Utely Robert M. Frontiersmen in Blue:  The United States Army and the Indian, 1848-1865 p 30

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 34

in view of asperations lately made, that Gen. Stuart has, throughout these late dangerous scenes, conducted himself so nobly as to put down all slanders, and endear himself more than ever to his command.  His coolness in difficulty, his perfect fearlessness, his boldness in the face of dangers, and his kind and gentle manner to his troops, and his inspiring confidence in himself, have won the highest praise even from those who spoke ill of him before.”

a member of the 11th Virginia

Oct 26 1863

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 318

“cool as a piece of ice, though all times laughing.”

a Rebel infantryman

Kershaw’s infantry in the Wilderness observing Stuart

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 344

“with his staff officers, Stuart was perfectly familiar

a staff officer

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 71

Stuart was by nature, intended to lead and command men.:  “rarely excited by anything,” to think with entire calmness.”

a staff officer commenting on Stuart

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 99

“his object was to teach us to be on the alert all the time; that as cavalry, were the eyes and ears of the army and that upon our vigilance depended the safety of the army.”

a trooper

June 1861

Driver, Robert J. , First and Second Maryland Cavalry CSA, Charlottesville, VA Rockville Publishing, 1999 , P. 11

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 61

“I saw General Stuart that day riding out on the field where shot and shell were raining around, and he didn’t seem to bat an eye.”

A Virginia sergeant recalling Stuart at Brandy  Station

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 243

“I always thought it an injustice to Stuart and a loss to the army he was not from the moment continued in command of Jackson’s corps.  He had won the right to it.  I believe he had all of Jackson’s genius and dash and originality without the eccentricity of character which sometimes led to disappointment…that Sunday morning’s action[on May 3] ought to rank with whatever else of special brilliancy can be found in the annals of the Army of Northern Virginia.”

Alexander, Porter

Alexander in a letter commenting on Stuart’s temporary command of Jackson’s corps

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 232

“it was bad pay to let our cavalry get out of touch & reach of our infantry….Such a raid could cut no real figure on the grand result, & was taking chances for no good.”

Alexander, Porter

Alexander’s comment on Stuart at Gettysburg

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 302

“Genl Stuart is galloping around.”

an artillery officer

an artillery officer noted this as Stuart prepares for the battle of Antietam

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 153

“it may prove that there is going to be a wild promiscuous ride by ‘our Jeb,’ in retaliation for what Stoneman has done.”

an infantryman who viewed the cavalry review

speculation after grand cavalry review of May 22 that there would be an offensive into Pennsylvania

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 237

“was as vain and frivolous as he was brave and dashing”

an officer

Wert, Jeffry D.  General James Longstreet. New York:  Touchstone, 1993. Pg 85

“Think Stuart had best stop his reviews and look to his laurels,”

Anderson, George T.

Anderson in his diary after Brandy Station

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 250

“does not impress me so favorably, a bold dashing soldier he doubtless is, but without the striking marks of high breeding which distinguished Gen Lee.”

Bernard, Helen

Dec 2 1862

Helen Bernard’s description of dinner guests Rooney Lee, Stuart, and John Pelham

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 186

“was liable to form sudden fancies for those who courted his good will, and in this way he put on his staff sometimes men who were not at all suitable.”

Blackford, William W.

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 71

[Jackson and Stuart]”were the only two men I ever knew whom I thought unconscious of the feeling of fear.  There were many as brave, but these two never seemed to feel that danger existed.”

Blackford, William W.

William Blackford describing Stuart and Jackson

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 81

“It was in action that Stuart showed the greatest advantage.  I have never seen his superior on a battlefield.”

Blackford, William W.

Blackford talking about Stuart on the battlefield after Brandy Station.

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 243

“a fearless rider, the wilder and more spirited the horse, the more enjoyment for him.”

Boyd, David French

A childhood friend remembers Stuart.  Boyd “Boyhood”, pp 17,18 Boyd Papers , LSU

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 7

“Stuart never liked to be checked or contradicted, never liked to be pg thwarted or opposed; it excited him; it made him mad and stronger.”

Boyd, David French

A childhood friend remembers Stuart.  Boyd “Boyhood”, pp 17,18 Boyd Papers , LSU

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 7

“was full of life and fun; loved to be outdoors and to romp and play.”

Boyd, David French

A childhood friend remembers Stuart.  Boyd “Boyhood”, pp 17,18 Boyd Papers , LSU

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 7

“Jackson unbent to Stuart more perhaps than any else in the Army, and Stuart, more than any one else was free and easy with him.”

Boyd, David French

Boyd, “Boyhood” pp 46,47

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 48

“with a peculiar searching, almost querulous impatience.”

Brown, Campbell

July 1 1863

Brown, Ewell’s AAG describing the tone of voice of R.E. Lee in asking the whereabouts of Stuart as the Battle of Gettysburg unfolds

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 281

“the man was a war-machine which never flagged”

Cooke, John Esten

an aide

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 71

“a thoroughly good hater.” ” His prejudices were strong and when once he had made up his mind deliberately , nothing could change him.  He was immovable and implacable; and against those offenders he threw the whole weight of his powerful will and his high position, determined to crush him.”

Cooke, John Esten

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 83

“Stuart was the most impulsive and Jackson the most reserved and reticent of men…[the two men] seemed to have a sincere friendship for each other which always impressed me as a very singular circumstance indeed; but so it was.”

Cooke, John Esten

Cooke commenting on the Jackson-Stuart friendship

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 198

“he is charming when he throws off business.  The days and nights were full of song and laughter.”

Cooke, John Esten

Flora’s cousin John Esten Cooke, an officer ironically that Stuart could barely tolerate

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 200

“In a charge, Stuart seemed on fire.”

Cooke, John Esten

Description of Stuart in action while commanding Jackson’s corps at Chancellorsville

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 228

“Stuart was born to fight cavalry.”

Cooke, John Esten

Cooke after Brandy Station

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 241

[Stuart’s]”voice was harsh, imperious, admitting no reply.”

Cooke, John Esten

Cooke describing Stuart’s voice during battle

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 245

“Everything about Stuart was broadly and vividly defined.  There were no half tints or negative colors either in his personal appearance or his character, and he stood out from the great war canvas like a prominent figure in some painting, brilliant and imposing, catching and holding the eye.”

Cooke, John Esten

October 5, 1878

Cooke said this of his former commander

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 370

“His faith in the justice of the struggle was absolute, and he never, to my knowledge, had one moment’s doubt as to the result of the war.”

Cooke, John Esten

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 370

“a remarkably fine, promising, pure young man, and has had so far an extraordinary promotion.”

Cooke, Philip St. George

Stuart’s father-in-law wrote this about Stuart shortly after his daughter’s wedding  Mitchell, Adele H., ed The Letters of Major General James E. B. Stuart. N.p.:Stuart-Mosby Historical Society, 1990

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 28

“It is a great misfortune not to be a Virginian…That in this war the post of honor is to be a Virginian & the post of labor and danger is to be a Georgian”

Deloney, William G.

July 21, 1862

Deloney of Cobb’s Legion describing Virginia vs. others rivalry

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 118

“Stuart is an ambitious man-he wants those about him who are his friends.  This is the first consideration-talent is the next….A little flattery & a daring spirit will bring promotion.”

Deloney, William G.

Deloney of Cobb’s Legion describing Stuart

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 178

“The intimacy between these two officers, so dissimilar in every respect, was the cause of much comment-they seemed to have so little in common….But Jackson was more free and familiar with Stuart than with any other officer in the army, and Stuart loved Jackson more than he did any living man.”

Douglas, Kyd

Douglas about the Stuart-Jackson friendship

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 163

“Personally I never liked or admired Stuart & still believe he was vain & pretentious & greatly overrated as a soldier. [but] Genl Stuarts reputation in the corps then was, in some respects only second to Jacksons.  Jackson had great admiration for him as a soldier…[and] knew the men of his corps would have more confidence in him than any man who would take his place.”

Douglas, Kyd

April 21 1893

Douglas addressing the decision to temporarily place Stuart in command of Jackson’s corps after his injury at Chancellorsville.

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 225

“Stuart’s was one of those magnetic natures, which always impress their own likeness upon others.”

Eggleston, George Gary

A Rebel’s Recollections Bloomington:  Indiana University Press, 1959

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 54

“I loved him as tho’ he were my own Mother’s son.”

FitzHugh, Norman R.

July 18 1864

Fitzhugh, in a letter to Flora Stuart

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 366

“He is a good-looking, jovial character, exactly like his photographs, he has certainly accomplished wonders, and done excellent service in his peculiar style of warfare.  He is a good and gallant soldier, though he sometimes incurs ridicule by his harmless affectation and peculiarities…No one can deny that he is the right man in the right place.”

Freemantle, Arthur

July 1863

Freemantle of the Coldstream Guards impression upon meeting  Stuart

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 297

“Somebody once said of Stuart, he is a dandy on dress parade, a belle at a ball, a boy in a possum hunt, and a hero in a fight.”

Giles, Valerius C.

A Texan describing Stuart

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 100

“Stewart[Stuart] is fond of society, but entirely abstemious as to drinks”

Gorgas, Josiah

Josiah Gorgas, Chief of Ordnance in his diary

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 326

“Lt. Col is one of the bravest & noblest men I have ever seen & a fine officer.  We have amusing times around our campfires at night talking the adventures of the day and cracking jokes.”

Hairston, Peter

Jun 5, 18, 1861

Stuart aide Peter Hairston – My darling one, Hariston Papers, UNC

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 54

“Stuart will as usual give all credit to his Virginia Brigades.  He praises them on all occasions, but does not give us any credit.”

Hampton, Wade

Hampton’s observation that Stuart favored the Virginia regiments

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 176

[Jackson’s]”fondness for Stuart was very great, and it was cordially reciprocated.  Their meeting after a temporary absence was affectionate and brotherly in the extreme.”

Hill, DH

Hill describing the Jackson-Stuart friendship

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 163

“the genuine soul, always full of life & humor”

Hotchkiss, Jedediah

Hotchkiss, Jackson’s topographer describing Stuart

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 199

“I can never forget the manliness of J.E.B. Stuart, of Virginia…He spoke to me, he visited me, and we became warm friends, often on Saturday afternoons, visiting the young ladies of the post together.”

Howard, O. O.

Howard, Autobiography, v.1, p. 53

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 16

“made his cavalry more completely and thoroughly [to] be ‘the eyes and ears’ of the army than any other officer I ever knew.”

Hubard, Robert E.

a former lieutenant in the 3rd Virginia

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 371

“I need not assure you of which you already know, that your friendship & admiration were cordially reciprocated by him.  I have frequently heard him speak of Genl Stuart as one of his warm personal friends, & also express admiration for your Soldierly qualities.”

Jackson, Mary Anna

Aug 1 1863

Mrs. Jackson responding to JEB Stuarts sympathy note

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 233

“Colonel Stuart and his command merit high praise, and I may here remark that he has exhibited those qualities which are calculated to make him eminent in his army of the service.”

Jackson, Thomas

July 2, 1861

OR, V. 2, P. 186Jackson commending Jackson for an action on July 2 1861 where Stuart captured 50 Union Cavalryman

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 55

“Jeb Stuart is my ideal of a cavalry leader, prompt, vigilant, and fearless.”

Jackson, Thomas

Jackson to D.H. Hill

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 137

“I should regard the assignment of any other officer than yourself to the command of the cavalry as a misfortune & of course, therefore, will do what I can to keep you in the position.  I have not moved in the matter because it has seemed to me impossible that any one could be put over you.”

Johnston, Joseph

Jun 22 1861

Johsnton-JEBS Jun 22 1861  Johnston responding to an inquiry by Stuart about a possible assignment of another officer to command the cavalry.

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 54

“He is a rare man, wonderfully endowed by nature with the qualities necessary for an officer of light cavalry…Calm, firm, acute, active, and enterprising, I know of no one more competent than he to estimate the occurrences before him at their true value.  If you add to this army a real brigade of cavalry, you can find no better brigadier general to command it.”

Johnston, Joseph

August 1861

In a letter to Jefferson Davis

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 62

“matchless as commander of outpost.”

Johnston, Joseph

memoirs

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 62

“he had never seen any one he considered his [Stuart’s] equal in our Cavalry service.”

Johnston, Joseph

Johnston comparing Stuart to Forrest and Wheeler

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 372

“You know I had little love for Stuart, and had just as little for me; but that is the greatest loss that army has ever sustained except for the death of Jackson.”

Jones, William E. (Grumble)

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 366

“Great, glorious and good- his loss to his country-to our army-Especially to his troopers, is inconsolable.  Whilst his bright glancing Eye can no longer see-his clear ringing voice no longer be heard by his mourning followers-may the principles he has taught us-the Example he has shown us not be lost.  Stuart had no superior as a soldier.

Lee, Fitzhugh

May 14 1864

Fitzhugh Lee’s General Order on the death of Stuart

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 366

“his rare genius, heightened spirit, indifference to danger, indefatigable energy, wonderful endurance in the saddle, supreme coolness in action, and enthusiastic devotion to the cause in which he offered up his life are too well known, and form too large apart of ‘the history of the times’ for me to dwell upon them here.”

Lee, Fitzhugh

Fitzhugh Lee in a battle report after Stuart’s death

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 372

“has ever been to me as one of my own family & I felt that we had no where a truer friend.”

Lee, Mary Custis

Hairston, ed., “J.E.B Stuart’s letters,” NCHR v 51 no 3, p.290

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 18

“For myself, I could scarcely grieve more deeply if one of my own sons had fallen.”

Lee, Mary Custis

Mary Custis Lee in a letter to Flora Stuart after Stuart’s death

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 368

“To the vigilance, boldness, and energy of General Stuart and his cavalry is chiefly due the early and valuable information of the movements of the enemy.  His reconnaissance’s frequently extended within the Federal lines, resulting in skirmishes and engagements, in which the cavalry was greatly distinguished.”

Lee, Robert E.

Lee praising the actions of Stuart’s cavalry in early December 1862

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 188

“the young major general had opened on them too soon.”

Lee, Robert E.

Dec 13, 1862

Lee remarking on Stuart’s premature firing of artillery at Fredericksburg

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 191

“I prefer your acts to speak for themselves, nor does your character or reputation require bolstering by out-of place expressions of my opinions

Lee, Robert E.

May 11 1863

Lee in a letter to Stuart responding to Stuart’s belief that his performance at Chancellorsville merited more public commendation

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 232

“Have you heard anything about my cavalry?  Any news to give me about General Stuart?”

Lee, Robert E.

July 1 1863

Lee asking for news about Stuart at Gettysburg

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 281

“Well General Stuart, you are here at last.”

Lee, Robert E.

July 2 1863

Lee’s greeting to Stuart upon his arrival at Gettysburg

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 282

“He never brought me a piece of false information.”

Lee, Robert E.

Lee purported remarked to another officer upon the death of Stuart

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 365

“A more zealous, ardent, brave & devoted soldier, than Stuart, the Confederacy cannot have.”

Lee, Robert E.

Lee privately to his wife.

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 365

“I never met a more interesting and charming young man.  He is very musical and sang many songs with Virginia and Vic.”

Lomax, Elizabeth

Summer 1859

Elizabeth Lomax describing a visit in the summer of 1859 with Lunsford Lomax’s family.  Lomax, Elizabeth. Leaves from an Old Washington Diary, Mount Vernon, NY Brooks Inc1943

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 36

“Stuart has been most untiring in the discharge of his duties at that and other advanced positions”

Longstreet, James

Sep 12 1861

Letter to Beauregard

Wert, Jeffry D.  General James Longstreet. New York:  Touchstone, 1993. Pg 85

“has been most untiring in the discharge of his duties…Colonel Stuart has, I think, fairly won his claim to brigadier, an I hope the commanding generals will unite with me in recommending him for that promotion.”

Longstreet, James

Aug 1861

Longstreet writing Johnston recommending Colonel Stuart’s promotion to brigadier general.

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 63

“I am under many obligations to Brig. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart who, while waiting for an opportunity to use his cavalry, was exceedingly active and zealous in conducting the different columns to their proper destinations and in assisting these to get into action.”

Longstreet, James

May 5 1863

Longstreet commending Stuart’s placement of infantry during the Battle of Williamsburg

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 86

“I often spoke of him to General Lee, as of the best material for cavalry service, but needing an older head to instruct and regulate him.  The General was fond of him, and gave way to him to the disadvantage of both.”

Longstreet, James

Longstreet in a postwar letter writing of Stuart.

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 261

“It seems to be about equal to what yours was when we first served together at Falls Church [in the summer and fall of 1861].  I have seen enough of your cavalry to know that you have improved vastly since that time.  As I have to deal with the Cavalry here I think that you had better send me a few suggestions occasionally instead of hoping to get any from this Service”

Longstreet, James

Oct 13 1863

Longstreet in a letter to Stuart from Tennessee bemoaning the poor quality of Western Cavalry

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 321

“a most noble, loveable man”

Marshall, Charles

Marshall, Lee’s military secretary on Stuart

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 300

“Stuart’s fondness for the use of artillery was almost excessive.”

McClellan, Henry B.

McClellan describing Stuart’s fondness for using artillery

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 112

“He ardently desired the applause of his superiors and his country, and was keenly alive to adverse criticism…He could never see or acknowledge that he was worsted in an engagement.”

McClellan, Henry B.

Stuart’s feelings after Brandy Station

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 252

“painful beyond description”

McClellan, Henry B.

July 2 1863

According to Henry McClellan, Stuart’s meeting with Lee upon his arrival at Gettysburg

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 282

“He was more quiet than usual, softer, and more communicative.  It seems now that the shadow of the near future was already upon him.”

McClellan, Henry B.

Henry McClellan with Stuart the day of his death

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 350

“But every day we miss our chief-our friend-our brother.  Every day the contrast between the present and the past returns to us, and time does not seem to soften hat contrast.  Oh! Mrs. Stuart, we did love him, how much, I knew no until he was taken away from us-to me he was the kindest friend I have ever known.”

McClellan, Henry B.

McClellan in a letter to Flora Stuart

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 366

“a buffoon to attract attention”

McLaws, Lafayette

McLaws in a letter to his wife around time of Brandy Station

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 250

“He was the best friend I ever had and made me all that I was in the War.”

Mosby, John

Mosby recalling his friendship with Stuart

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 207

“Stuart was ambitious as Caesar, was as full of dash as he was ambitious.  He always took special care of himself.”

Munford, Thomas

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 98

“He was a light-hearted dashing rollicking young fellow, devoted to admiration, fond of dancing and pretty young girls-fond of music &full of fun.”

Munford, Thomas

Munford describing Stuart in a postwar letter.

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 142

“never have I seen such a magnificent looking soldier.  Faultlessly dressed, grandly mounted, with long, silky auburn locks curling beneath his plumed hat.”

Nisbet, James Cooper

March 1862

a Georgia infantry captain describing Stuart in March 1862

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 80

“he led almost everything…Perpetual activity was a necessity of his existence.”

Opie, John N.

Opie, A Rebel Cavalryman with Lee, Stuart and Jackson.  Reprint Dayton OH:  Press of Morningside Bookshop, 1972 p 91

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 54

“I did not like Genl Stuart & did not want to see him command that corps…I think it was wise in that emergency after Hill to select Stuart to select Stuart for the command…Stuart was well known in the corps.”

Palmer, William H.

Palmer, AP Hills Chief of Staff on the selection of Stuart to temporarily command Jackson’s corps at the battle of Chancellorsville

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 224

“Beaut Stuart who commands in advance has gained probably more reputation than any young man in the Army.  It was talked in Richmond that he was to be made a General.  Every one speaks [of Stuart] in the highest terms.”

Pender, Dorsey

June 1861

Pender commenting on the success of West Point classmate in the first months of the war

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 62

“I have lost my best friend in the army.  I cannot realize he is gone, that I am to see his gallant figure, nor hear his cheering voice no more.”

Powers, Philip H.

May 15 1864

Powers, Stuart’s quartermaster in a letter to his wife

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 366

“His physical constitution was superb, and his powers of endurance defied fatigue.  Simple existence to him was a pleasure.”

Price, Channing

Oct 15 1862

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 174

“An inferior may approach him with ease, as he displays none of that hauteur which some officers assume.  He dispatches business promptly, and at the same time converses with his visitors in a social and friendly style that at once secures confidence and commands respect.”

Richmond Daily Dispatch

Oct 31 1861

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 71

“He rode the lines with flashing eyes and heroic courage, exhorting, commanding, inspiring.  He seemed tireless, he seemed everywhere…He noticed the passage of shot and shell with absolute indifference.”

Robertson, Frank

Description of Stuart in action while commanding Jackson’s corps at Chancellorsville

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 228

“Stuart’s camp is always one of the jolliest, as the General is very fond of music and singing, and is always gay and in good spirits himself, and when he laughs heartily, as frequently happens, he winds up with a shout very cheering to hear.”

Ross, Fitzgerald

Ross, and Englishman who served with the Austrian Hussars celebrated Christmas with Stuart in 1863

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 326

“his hard horse sense ought to have told him to stick to Lee”

Royall, William L.

a final word on Stuart’s actions at Gettysburg

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 302

“In a simple tent which also seemed to be his office, I found a young man in his thirties, with bold flashing eyes and full beard, who looked very well in his gray jacket with the insignia of a general, in gray trousers tucked in his high boots.  He greeted me with frank and noble propriety.”

Scheibert, Justus

April 1863

Scheibert, an engineer officer in the Prussian army describes his first meeting and impression of Stuart

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 211

“The greatest cavalryman ever foaled in America”

Sedgwick, John

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause.  New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 372

“…you have not omitted to display that cheerfulness and zeal in their performance which if preserved, will not fail to be appreciated by those with whom you may serve, and to secure a favorable reputation as an officer.”

Simonsen, John S.

May 8 1855

Simonsen, an officer in the Mounted Rifles in a letter to Stuart upon his transfer to the 1st Cavalry.  John S. Simonsen – JEBS May 8 1855

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 22

“No more welcome guest ever came than General J.E.B. Stuart.  With clanking saber and spurs and waving black plume he came, and was warmly greeted at the door.  Papers and work were all hastily laid aside.”

Smith, James Power

Smith of Jackson’s staff describes a visit by Stuart

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 198

“His disposition so happy and sunny, his enterprise so untiring, his soul so valiant, all sprang to our memories.”

Sorrel, Moxley

Sorrel remembering JEB Stuart after his death.

Sorrell, G. Moxley.  Recollections of a Confederate Staff Officer. New York:  Bantam edition, 1992. Pg 214

“Our sense of security against surprise [was] so confident with him in the saddle.”

Sorrel, Moxley

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 371

“generous to a fault, genial and vivacious in spirit”

Stevenson, George J.

A classmate of Stuart’s at Emory and Henry College describes Stuart.  Stevenson, George J. Increase in Excellence:  A History of Emory and Henry College. New York:  Appleton-Century Crofts, 1963, p 206-7

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 10

“I went over to see Gen. Stuart short time ago, & he is fixed up more comfortably than any General in the field unless it is Gen. Lee”

Stiles, William H.

Feb 19 1864

Stiles of the 60th Georgia Inf in a letter to his father

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 330

“He was noble & true, but his inner life was one of the purest & most exalted I have ever known.”

Stuart, Flora

Stuart’s wife Flora describing him years after the wedding.  Flora Stuart – My Dear Sir, n.d., Stuart Papers, VHS

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 28

“he told me he never expected to live through the war, and that if we were conquered, that he did not want to live.”

Venable, Charles

Stuart’s premonition of death as told to Venable

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 349

“was always in front, and five shells burst very near him, but he bore himself most gallantly and escaped uninjured.”

March 1862

a newspaper correspondent describing Stuart’s actions in March 1862

Wert, Jeffry D. Cavalryman of the Lost Cause. New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2008. Pg 80

4 Responses

  1. I know that JEB Stuart’s letters were published at one time. Are they available anywhere, in book form? Your quotes above convince me I need to get Wert’s book!

    • I have looked around for a collection of letters but have not come across them. Wert’s book is definitely one to get. Thanks for checking the site out. Regards Jim

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